Login

Printing in PowerPoint: Understanding Your Printing Options

An error occurred trying to load this video.

Try refreshing the page, or contact customer support.

Coming up next: Packaging Your PowerPoint Presentation: CDs & USB

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Take Quiz Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:03 Printing in PowerPoint
  • 0:33 Select the Slides to Print
  • 2:14 Choosing the Layout
  • 3:12 When You Are Ready to Print
  • 3:48 Lesson Summary
Add to Add to Add to

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Login or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay
Create an account to start this course today
Try it free for 5 days!
Create An Account

Recommended Lessons and Courses for You

Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Karen Sorensen

Karen has a Bachelors in Communications. She has 25 years of experience in Information Systems, Adult Learning and Virtual Training.

You can do more than project your presentation to a large screen with PowerPoint. PowerPoint has several advanced options for printing your slides. This lesson will introduce you to the different printing options in PowerPoint.

Printing in PowerPoint

So, let's talk about printing in PowerPoint. The Print command is located under the File menu, and PowerPoint offers several options for printing your slides, such as different Layouts, which are pages that are formatted specifically for printing. For example, you can change your slides to a format more suitable for handouts because it's common for presenters to print out a paper copy for their audience. This lesson will introduce you to the most common printing options in PowerPoint.

Select the Slides to Print

If you click on the Print command, you will see a group of options called Settings. The first option is to select what slides to print, and although most of the time you will Print All Slides, you will have occasions where you will want to print a particular slide or maybe a set of slides. For example, imagine you are collaborating on a presentation, and you have printed a draft copy for you and your subject matter expert (or SME as they're called) to review. You need to make changes and send a final, hard-copy draft to your manager for a final review.

After you meet with the SME on the project, you make changes to only the first two slides. Using this option, you will not need to re-print the entire presentation. Re-print only the first two slides, add them to the slides you didn't change, and you are good to go for your manager. Simply enter the slides you want to print in the Slide box. Here are some helpful hints when entering the range of slides to print:

  • If you want to print a range of slides, you can put it in this way: 1-10.
  • If you want to print single slides, you can separate the slide number by a comma, for example: 1, 2, 5, 10.
  • Or, you can combine different formats, for example: 1, 2, 5-10, which will print slides 1 and 2, and then the slides between 5 and 10.

In our scenario, we want to print only the first two slides. The range we would enter into the Slide box would be 1-2, or we could use 1, 2 - either one will work.

Choosing the Layout

The next option is choosing a Layout. If you click on the Full Page Slides option, you will see several layout options, such as printing full pages, pages with your notes, or the outline. A common layout here is to print your Notes Pages. As you create your slides, you can add your own speaking notes to each slide, then print the slide and notes to help you rehearse or to use during your presentation. In addition, you can choose different layouts for your handouts. Here you can choose how many slides per page you would like to print:

You can choose how many slides to print per page.
available layouts to print slides

The most common choice for handouts is three slides per page, which includes an area for your audience to take notes. As you can see above, you can print up to nine slides per page. However, I find the layout to be very hard to read. The slides are small and the content is even smaller. I suggest, that if you want handouts for your audience, three slides per page is best.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register for a free trial

Are you a student or a teacher?
I am a teacher
What is your educational goal?
 Back

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 95 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 2,000 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it free for 5 days!
Create An Account
Support