Copyright

Public Relations: Effective Government Relations

An error occurred trying to load this video.

Try refreshing the page, or contact customer support.

Coming up next: Political Power: Political Parties, Interest Groups & Political Action Committees (PACs)

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Take Quiz Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:04 Government Communications
  • 0:41 Government Relations
  • 1:53 Importance
  • 2:38 Goals
  • 4:39 Lesson Summary
Add to Add to Add to

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Log in or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay
Speed
Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Beth Hendricks

Beth holds a master's degree in integrated marketing communications, and has worked in journalism and marketing throughout her career.

An effective government relations plan can help build relationships and foster advocacy opportunities. In this lesson, learn more about how communications organizations can set goals for effective government relations.

Government Communications

For many people, the halls of government are imposing, confusing, or even intimidating to understand and navigate. For that reason, many people worry about laws and legislation only after they've been passed or implemented.

For public relations firms, an effective government relations strategy is an important piece of doing right by their clients. Such strategies can help build relationships between businesses and legislators, secure funding, and provide laws and legislation that can positively impact an organization.

Let's take a closer look at a government relations portion of a communications agency.

Government Relations

By the very nature of its name, public relations involves interactions and communications between various organizations and the public. This includes:

  • Anticipating and interpreting public opinion
  • Researching programs of action to educate the public
  • Setting objectives and plans to convey a particular message

A logical part of communicating with the public also involves communicating with the public about legislative policy decisions; conveying an organization's responsibilities as it relates to those policy decisions; and having an opportunity to influence and change public policy. As such, a strong government relations practice is essential to the public relations umbrella of any communications organization.

Government relations specifically focuses on how an organization interacts with the government and its various branches and officials. This is the area of public relations that helps build relationships and positive interactions between an organization and government officials.

Government relations relies heavily on communicating about regulatory issues, one-on-one conversations with government representatives, and lobbying efforts on behalf of a group or organization.

Importance

Communications organizations have a responsibility to their clients to be well-versed in all areas of communication, including positive interaction with government agencies and officials. For businesses of any size, navigating government circles can be a tedious and confusing process. Communications agencies can help circumvent some of those struggles for clients.

A good government relations practice should be able to:

  • Represent a client and their interests from a wide variety of industries
  • Provide knowledge in legislative developments
  • Offer targeted messaging to reach government agencies and officials
  • Conduct direct lobbying on behalf of a customer's concerns
  • Build relationships with key government officials

Goals

To be effective in government relations there must be a roadmap set to maximize a plan for success. Let's take a look at a fictional example of a communications firm working with a healthcare organization.

ABC Communications has been retained by Acme Healthcare for government relations communications. On Acme's behalf, ABC will:

1. Regularly visit with lawmakers, elected officials and their staff members, or even make phone calls or write letters to stay in touch and build relationships.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register to view this lesson

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Try it risk-free for 30 days

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it risk-free for 30 days!
Create An Account
Support