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Revised Book: Definition & Examples

Instructor: Mary Firestone
Find out what a revised book is, and what is changed when a book is revised. Learn how revised books appear in Works Cited and Reference pages. Read the lesson, and then take a quiz to test your new knowledge.

Revised Book

A revised book is one that's been changed since the previously published version. The reasons for revising a book may vary. Sometimes the author learns more about the topic and wants to add that to the original content. Alternatively, corrections and updates might make the revision necessary. Revised books keep their original titles and are often published as new editions. These revised editions may be called second and third editions, and so on.

Using Revised Books

If you use a revised book as a source, be sure to include the correct edition in your bibliographic listing. If you use APA (American Psychological Association) style, the revised book would appear like this on the References page:

Rogers, E.M. (2003). The diffusion of innovations (5th ed.) New York, NY: Simon & Schuster

If you use a revised book in an MLA (Modern Language Association) document, your listing would look like this on the Works Cited page:

Jones, Don. The Mystery Class. 2nd ed. Woodstock: Overlook, 2000. Print

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