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Room 101 Lesson Plan

Instructor: Kerry Gray

Kerry has been a teacher and an administrator for more than twenty years. She has a Master of Education degree.

This lesson plan provides teachers with ideas for incorporating Room 101 speeches in their classes. Students will gain background information about Room 101 and persuasive speaking before writing and delivering their own speech.

Learning Objectives

After this lesson students will be able to:

  • identify the significance of Room 101.
  • describe the format of a persuasive speech.
  • write and deliver a Room 101-type speech.

Length

This lesson will take approximately 45-90 minutes.

Curriculum Standards

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.3

Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.4

Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.5

Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Lesson Instructions

Materials needed: chart paper, markers, computer/internet, video clip of Room 101 TV show

Background

Ask students to name some of George Orwell's literary works (Animal Farm, 1984). See if anyone remembers Room 101 in 1984, and ask them to describe the room and its use. Tell students they'll watch a short video giving more details about this room.

Play Room 101 in 1984. Ask students what other types of things could be found in Room 101. Explain that the idea of putting something in Room 101 was developed into a tv show on the BBC in which three celebrities compete by persuading the host to agree with them about something that needs to be banished. Play a clip from the show for students.

Brainstorming

Divide students into small groups. Provide each group with a sheet of chart paper and markers.

Have students brainstorm a list of things they hate so much that they wish they could banish them to Room 101. Provide an opportunity for groups to share their lists with the class.

Explain that in this lesson, students will try to persuade others that something should be banished to Room 101.

Ask students what it means to persuade.

Have students turn and talk with a partner about a time they persuaded someone else to do something. Then, have partners discuss a time that someone else persuaded them to do something. What methods were used in each scenario?

Have students choose one item to banish as the topic for their speech.

Speech Writing

Have students create a graphic organizer by folding a sheet of paper into thirds and labeling the sections: Opening, Body, Closing.

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