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Sample Behavior Intervention Plan for Aggression

Instructor: Clio Stearns

Clio has taught education courses at the college level and has a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction.

Having a strong behavior intervention plan can make all the difference in helping your students succeed. This lesson offers a sample for what a plan might look like when a child is struggling with aggression.

Why a Behavior Plan Matters

Have you ever taught a student who struggles with aggression? If so, you know how challenging this issue can be. On the one hand, you want to empathize with your student and treat them with respect and care. On the other hand, though, you want to be firm in helping them manage truly problematic behaviors.

One of the best things you can do for students who struggle with aggression is create behavior intervention plans (BIPs). These plans are concrete measures teachers and school support staff can take to help carry out the goals and objectives in the student's IEP that relate directly to behavior. Having a good behavior intervention plan is an important way to get all school staff on the same page in terms of helping the student, while defining clear goals and establishing measures for assessment.

There are a lot of different ways to develop a behavior intervention plan. This lesson offers a sample of what such a plan might look like for a student who struggles with aggression.

Sample Behavior Intervention Plan

Introductory Statement

This behavior intervention plan is meant to support the goals and objectives in the IEP created on September 15, 2016. It should be considered an addendum to the IEP.

Preventative Strategies and Modifications

In order to provide a school program that will help Julia succeed, we recommend the following strategies and modifications for her school program.

  • Arrange for an adult to meet her school bus in the morning and bring her to the classroom, so that she can begin the school day calmly and with support.
  • Create a 'cool down' corner for Julia in the classroom and in all specialists' classrooms. Use the cool down corner consistently, explaining to Julia that it is a place for her to go and take deep breaths or practice counting when she is angry or feeling aggressive.
  • Preview small group and partnership work with Julia, to ensure that she knows what to expect and is less likely to be triggered by the experience of collaboration.
  • Establish a nonverbal signal to tell Julia that it is time for her to cool down or take a break from the group.
  • Have Julia attend weekly sessions with the guidance counselor in a small group and biweekly group sessions to learn about anger management strategies, self-regulation, and socially appropriate behaviors.

Level One Interventions for Encouraging Appropriate Behaviors

These interventions should be used when Julia is still calm and responsive to verbal redirection, to avoid her escalation to aggression.

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