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Simple & Compound Predicate Activities

Instructor: Clio Stearns

Clio has taught education courses at the college level and has a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction.

When students can tell the difference between a simple and a compound predicate, they are able to be better readers and writers. This lesson offers some activities that help students understand different kinds of predicates.

Simple and Compound Predicates

Are you trying to help your students understand different kinds of sentences and sentence structures? You probably know that when they have a better understanding of grammatical variation, their reading comprehension is stronger and their own writing is more sophisticated and complex. One idea you might want to teach your students about is simple and compound predicates. A predicate is the part of a sentence that the subject acts on; it usually contains a verb and sometimes a direct or indirect object. A simple predicate contains only one verb, while a compound predicate has two or more that are joined by a conjunction. This lesson teaches you some fun and meaningful activities you can use to teach your students about different kinds of predicates.

Visual Activities

The activities in this section are a good match for learners who like to work with images and graphic organizers to make sense of ideas.

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