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Skateboard Design Lesson Plan

Instructor: Christopher Muscato

Chris has a master's degree in history and teaches at the University of Northern Colorado.

With this lesson plan, your students are going to talk about skateboard art in terms of designing for a specific audience. They will apply their ideas to their own finalized skateboard design.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this lesson, your students will be able to:

  • Connect design to specific audiences and subcultures.
  • Express the value of targeted design in commercial art.
  • Apply their knowledge to their own skateboard designs.

Length

60-90 minutes

Curriculum Standards

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.9-10.2.D

Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.9-10.2.E

Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.C

Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

Materials

  • Slideshow of skateboard designs
  • Paper, old skateboards, or skateboard-shaped panels
  • Colored pencils, pastels, graphic design software, acrylics and/or spray paint

Instructions

  • Begin class by asking them to think about why skateboards tend to have such elaborate designs on the bottoms of the boards. Discuss this as a class.
  • Show the class a slideshow of skateboard designs, or display several skateboards for them to examine. Discuss these designs as a class.
    • What sort of motifs do you see in these designs?
    • What is the overall aesthetic of these designs? How do color, shape, and line play into this? How would you describe these colors?
    • Do these designs rely on representational or abstract figures? How do text or calligraphy play into this design? What is the value of using stylized lettering?
    • Overall, what is the design of a skateboard meant to do? How does this help reinforce an identity? What specific market are skateboard designers catering to? How does the awareness of the consumer impact the designers' choices?

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