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Snowball's Quotes from Animal Farm

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  • 0:02 Who Is Snowball?
  • 1:03 Quotes About Revolution
  • 3:00 Snowball on Humans
  • 4:17 Snowball & the Windmill
  • 5:44 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Liz Breazeale
In this lesson, we examine some of the more important quotes made by the character Snowball, a pig from George Orwell's novella 'Animal Farm'. Snowball has very forthright views on such things as revolution, humans, and progress.

Who Is Snowball?

Snowball is a character in George Orwell's allegorical novella Animal Farm. Snowball is one of the pigs. That's not a metaphor, he's actually a pig. He is an instigator of the rebellion against Mr. Jones. He's very intelligent, a great strategist and military leader, and, it seems, is a true believer in the revolution's aim of equality for all animals. He's also very brave, and isn't afraid to throw himself into any battle that comes along. Makes you look at pigs a little bit differently, doesn't it?

Snowball seems to be an earnest sort of guy...er, animal, and often comes up with schemes that will ultimately better the lives of the animals. He's a passionate, forceful speaker, and often uses his golden tongue to convince the animals of his ideas. Unfortunately, it seems to be the case in most revolutions that force will eventually conquer idealism. In this case, Snowball winds up being run off the farm by his enemy and former ally, the pig Napoleon - but more on that soon!

Snowball's Quotes About Revolution

As mentioned before, Snowball is a big-time revolutionary and seems to truly want to do good things for his fellow animals - starting with kicking out Mr. Jones. He honestly believes in what he does, and he seems to really want to make his comrades' lives better. He believes that running off Mr. Jones is the first step toward liberty and equality, and at one point laughs derisively: 'Ribbons,' he said, 'should be considered as clothes, which are the mark of a human being. All animals should go naked.' Yeah, that's pretty hardcore, wouldn't you say? Snowball is such a revolutionary and is so devoted to the whole 'overthrowing humans' idea, that he won't even allow the horses to wear ribbons in their manes. He even professes the '...need for all animals to be ready to die for Animal Farm if need be.'

In terms of ideals, Snowball does genuinely try to help everyone. He even designs the flag of Animal Farm to reflect the revolution's aims of equality and an animal-controlled England: 'The flag was green, Snowball explained, to represent the green fields of England, while the hoof and horn signified the future Republic of the Animals…' And, while he's at it, Snowball also paints the Seven Commandments of Animalism, the ruling philosophy of the farm and the revolution, on the barn, and reads them out:

  1. Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.
  2. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend.
  3. No animal shall wear clothes.
  4. No animal shall sleep in a bed.
  5. No animal shall drink alcohol.
  6. No animal shall kill any other animal.
  7. All animals are equal.

This pretty much summarizes everything Snowball believes - including his feelings on humans, which you'll see in greater depth next.

Snowball on Humans

As you can imagine from his part in the rebellion against Jones, Snowball has an awful lot of negative feelings about humans and has plenty of things to say on the subject. He believes that humans are lazy and earn what they have by the sweat of the animals, and it shows in his statements. He distills the Seven Commandments of Animalism to one singular saying: 'Four legs good, two legs bad.' Catchy, isn't it? And it certainly gets the job done, as even the less intelligent animals memorize this in no time at all. Though he does have to convince the birds that wings don't count as arms, and, even though the birds only have two legs, they're not bad like humans.

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