Copyright

Social Characteristics of an Aging Population

An error occurred trying to load this video.

Try refreshing the page, or contact customer support.

Coming up next: Health Characteristics of an Aging Population

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Take Quiz Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:02 Late Adulthood
  • 1:00 Social Challenges
  • 2:28 Financial Challenges
  • 4:02 Lesson Summary
Add to Add to Add to

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Login or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay

Recommended Lessons and Courses for You

Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Natalie Boyd

Natalie is a teacher and holds an MA in English Education and is in progress on her PhD in psychology.

As people age, they face new challenges and changes in their social life. In this lesson, we will discuss the social characteristics of the aging population, including marital status, living arrangements, financial issues, and workforce issues.

Late Adulthood

Edie just turned 80, and she figured that, by this age, she'd be pretty well settled. But her life is still rapidly changing around her. Her husband passed last year, and now she's wondering if she should stay in her home or move somewhere else.

Edie is in late adulthood, or the time of life after age 65. This time of life is characterized by lots of life changes and challenges. Take Edie: she's dealing with grief and possibly a move. Plus, she's retired, so her finances are always a concern. All of this is very different from how it was a couple of decades ago, when she was in middle age!

Many of the changes and challenges that older adults face are not unique to old age. However, the combination of all of the challenges together makes for a new challenge for many people. Let's look closer at some of the changes that people in late adulthood might face.

Social Challenges

One of the biggest areas of change for older adults is in the social sphere. Remember that Edie's husband died last year, and she is now considering moving.

Marital status often changes in late adulthood, either due to widowhood or divorce. Edie has seen this in herself and her friends. As a widow, Edie has to deal with what it means to be alone for the first time in a very long time. Some of her friends are dealing with a similar adjustment as they go through divorces.

In addition, many older adults' living arrangements change as they age. Edie's not sure she wants to stay in her house all by herself, so she's been considering moving to a retirement home. Nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and retirement homes (or continuing care communities) are all part of a system of housing that many older adults end up utilizing as they age.

Edie doesn't need a nursing home or assisted living facility yet because she's able to take care of herself. But being in a retirement community that allows her to be around people her age and take advantage of health care and social options might be a good move for her. Isolation is a serious danger for many older adults, and if Edie can surround herself with people she enjoys being around, she can avoid isolation. Since isolation can lead to serious psychological and physical issues, this is a very good thing to avoid!

Financial Challenges

The social changes with regards to marital status, living arrangements and isolation are not the only ones facing Edie. As a retired person, she also faces new challenges that she didn't have when she was working.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register for a free trial

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Free 5-day trial

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 160 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it free for 5 days!
Create An Account
Support