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Social Stories on Running Out of the Classroom

Instructor: Amanda Robb

Amanda holds a Masters in Science from Tufts Medical School in Cellular and Molecular Physiology. She has taught high school Biology and Physics for 8 years.

In this lesson, we'll be reviewing the purpose of social stories and then looking at examples of social stories on running out of the classroom. By the end of the lesson, you should have an understanding of how to construct your own social stories.

What Are Social Stories?

Although how to act in a classroom might seem intuitive, the unspoken social cues that normally instruct us can be very difficult for students on the autism spectrum or with other challenges to understand. Social stories are short, first person narratives that describe a difficult behavior and ways a student can appropriately respond. Usually, each sentence in a social story is accompanied by a picture, PowerPoint, or other multimedia visual to show students how to carry out the actions described. Today, we'll go over some examples of social stories that help students understand why they should stop running out of the classroom, a common avoidance behavior.

Running Away to Escape Schoolwork

Sometimes, schoolwork is hard for me.

I don't like doing the work, so I run out of the classroom.

My teacher doesn't like it when I run out of the classroom.

If I run out of the classroom I might get hurt, get lost, or miss something important.

I like being safe, and learning is fun.

To stay safe and learn, I need to stay in the classroom.

If the work is too hard, I can raise my hand and ask for help.

Choose images that show positive behavior for your social stories.
raised hand

My teacher will help me, and I will feel proud because I did my work.

Being proud feels good.

Running Away to Escape a Noisy Room

Sometimes, I feel overwhelmed in class.

I think the lights are too bright and there are too many noises.

I run out of the classroom to escape these feelings.

The lights and noise don't bother my classmates or my teacher.

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