Solicitation: Definition & Laws

Solicitation: Definition & Laws
Coming up next: Victimless Crimes: Definition, Types & Examples

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Take Quiz Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:04 What Is Solicitation?
  • 1:10 Solicitation Laws
  • 2:02 Lesson Summary
Save Save Save

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Log in or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay
Speed
Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Jessica Schubert

Jessica is a practicing attorney and has taught law and has a J.D. and LL.M.

Learn what constitutes solicitation in the legal world. We'll examine the definition of solicitation and review laws that govern this crime. Once you have completed this lesson, you will have a thorough understanding of solicitation.

What is Solicitation?

Have you ever watched a police drama on television where a prostitute gets arrested for 'soliciting' an undercover cop? Solicitation is a crime where one commands, incites, urges, persuades, or requests that another individual commit a crime or attempt to commit a crime. The actual crime in this case is the solicitation itself, not the act of committing the crime. In other words, whether the crime is carried out does not matter; the fact that one seeks to involve another person in the crime is the key to solicitation.

The most common example of solicitation is prostitution, which involves exchanging sexual acts for some sort of payment. For instance, as in the previous example, a prostitute might seek to persuade an undercover police officer to commit the crime of prostitution. This would constitute solicitation by the prostitute. If the police officer agreed to the terms, the officer would be guilty of solicitation as well. There are other types of solicitation besides prostitution; these include the solicitation of someone to commit murder or another violent assault.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register to view this lesson

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Try it risk-free for 30 days

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it risk-free for 30 days!
Create an account
Support