Copyright

Stanines: Definition & Explanation

Stanines: Definition & Explanation
Coming up next: What is a Consent Form? - Examples & Concept

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Take Quiz Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:01 What Is Stanine?
  • 0:35 Stanines in Math
  • 1:53 Lesson Summary
Save Save Save

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Log in or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay
Speed

Recommended Lessons and Courses for You

Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Chevette Alston

Dr. Alston has taught intro psychology, child psychology, and developmental psychology at 2-year and 4-year schools.

This lesson gives a brief overview of what a stanine is and how it relates to a normal distribution. It also explains why stanines were important to storing testing information.

What Is a Stanine?

Stanine stands for standard nine and indicates nine statistical units from a scale of 1 to 9. These units are used to indicate a performance level on a psychological or educational test. A stanine is easy to find because there are only nine units. Although stanines provide the same information as other standard scores, they are less accurate. For example, in the table below, only stanines 4, 5, and 6 are within an average range of classification. However, within the Standard Score table below the Stanine table, there is a range of scores from 90 to 109.

Normal Distribution

Stanines in Math

In math, a stanine is a way to scale test scores. The mean (average) is always 5 with a standard deviation of two. A standard deviation is a measure of dispersion or variation in the distribution of a data set. Stanines are integers and can be used to convert a test score into a single digit. This was important when computers were the size of dinosaurs but used small paper punch cards because these were the most popular method of storing testing information. Today there are very few tests that use stanines to report testing information. However, these scores can be useful in understanding a relative range of a performance.

Stanine Bell Curve

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register to view this lesson

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Try it risk-free for 30 days

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it risk-free for 30 days!
Create an account
Support