Strategies for Selling to Multiple Buyers at Once

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  • 0:02 Addressing Multiple Buyers
  • 0:42 Methods for Selling to…
  • 2:30 Asking for the Sale
  • 2:56 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: David Whitsett

David has taught computer applications, computer fundamentals, computer networking, and marketing at the college level. He has a MBA in marketing.

A married couple walks into your store, contemplating making a major purchase. You're on deck and approach them--now what? In this lesson, we examine the challenges of working with more than one buyer in a deal.

Addressing Multiple Buyers

You are a new sales rep in an appliance store. Your head is full of facts and figures from training and you've got a good grasp on the features and benefits of your inventory. A couple approaches you and says they're interested in a new side-by-side refrigerator. In this case, all of your product knowledge will definitely help, but the most important factor is how you handle selling to two people instead of one.

Why is that? Each person may have different perspectives, goals, and levels of interest in the purchase. One may really want to be there, and the other one doesn't. You may be asked to settle differences and you may witness a power struggle. Satisfying the needs and wishes of two people can be complex. Let's look at some strategies for selling to multiple buyers.

Methods for Selling to Two People

What's the best way to proceed? Let's look at a few possible scenarios and how to deal with them:

Who's the boss?

With a lot of couples, one person might be dominant and do most of the talking. However, your chances of success will go up if you involve them both, so ask questions to each customer. If you ask one person about features they want, ask the other what they think too.

Competing goals

Having both people be a part of the decision

is a good thing, but they might want different product features. Take both of their wish lists and see if you have a model with most of the relevant features that they agree on.

Individual uncertainty

One partner is enthusiastic about moving forward; the other, not so much. You want to move the unsure one forward in the process without making them feel like you and their partner are ganging up on them. Ask questions to see if you can uncover the source of discomfort and deal with it.

Disparate perspectives

Maybe finances are the main concern of one partner while the other one is more interested in trouble-free service. Look for a compromise position that might make sense to both of them. For example, find a model with a longer standard warranty where buying an extended warranty might not be necessary.

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