Stroma Cells: Definition & Function

Instructor: Jeremy Battista
There are many different types of tissue found in animals. One such tissue, stroma, are very basic yet essential to our survival. These stroma cells help our internal organs and allow us to live and function. We will talk about these here.

What Are Stroma Cells?

In animals -- or really, in any multicellular organism -- we will find many different types of cells. Some can be more complex than others, and all have a particular function or use. Stroma cells are a specific type of cell found in animals. They provide support, structure, and anchoring for many of the different organs that exist inside of us. Essentially any of the organs of the body have these stroma cells. They are connective in nature and are similar to things such a ligaments.

Tissues can typically be classified in one of two ways. The first is based off of their particular function, such as organs and organ systems. The second way is to classify them based on their components that make up their cellular structure. It is in this second class that we see stroma cells organized and classified.

Function Of Stroma Cells

The main function of stroma cells is to help support organs and act as connective tissue for particular organs. The connective tissue here connects to the parenchyma cells of things such as blood vessels and nerves. The stroma cells will help to reduce stress over the organ. They also help to allow the organ to function where and when it has to, but they are not the functional tissue of the cell. Stromal tissue and cells are structural in scope, not as functional as parenchyma cells.

Two Types of Stroma Cells

There are two types of distinct and different stromal tissue. The first is loose connective tissue and the second is stromal tissue that is dense and irregular. The first kind, the loose connective tissue, serves as the main role of the stromal tissue. It literally connects the blood vessels and nerves to an anchor point, giving it structural integrity. This also may be the site of an inflammatory response of the body, the part that will swell when needed by the body.

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