Teaching ELL Students to Read

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  • 0:04 Teaching ELLs to Read
  • 1:22 Scaffold Instruction
  • 2:22 Emphasize Vocabulary
  • 2:48 Model Good Reading
  • 3:40 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Marquis Grant
There has been an increase in the number of English language learners (ELLs) in the classroom. This lesson highlights ways to teach ELLs to become successful readers.

Teaching ELLs to Read

In the school setting, English language learners (ELLs) are those students whose primary language is not English. These students may have been born in another country or they may have been born in the United States but raised in households where English is limited or non-existent.

An increase in the number of English language learners in the classrooms means teachers need to find strategies and activities that will support those students academically. One of the main areas where ELLs struggle is reading, largely because of language barriers. These students may struggle with decoding, the sounding out of unfamiliar words, or comprehension, being able to understand what they are reading.

Teaching ELL students to read may be challenging for both the educator and student, but it is not impossible. It's just a matter of finding strategies and activities that are best suited for the needs and learning styles of your students. Because of diverse student needs, especially your ELL students, you will want to look for ways to differentiate your instruction so that all of your students benefit from the lesson. When you differentiate instruction, you typically use different materials, resources and instructional methods so that all of your students' learning needs are supported. You may want to consider strategies such as scaffolding instruction, chunking the text, emphasizing vocabulary and modeling good reading.

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