Copyright

Tennis Lesson Plan for Elementary School

Instructor: Dana Dance-Schissel

Dana teaches social sciences at the college level and English and psychology at the high school level. She has master's degrees in applied, clinical and community psychology.

Tennis is a great sport to introduce to young students. This lesson plan uses a text lesson to summarize the sport, tennis equipment and scoring practices. An activity mirrors an actual game of tennis in the classroom.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • list the necessary equipment required for playing tennis
  • explain basic tennis strokes
  • summarize the process of scoring in tennis
  • define 'grand slam' and name some professional players who have captured the title

Length

45 to 60 minutes

Curriculum Standards

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.1

Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.2

Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.3

Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.4

Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.7

Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

Materials

  • A tennis racquet (also spelled 'racket')
  • A tennis ball
  • Paper copies of the text lesson Tennis Lesson for Kids: History & Facts
  • Photocopies of the worksheet from the associated text lesson
  • Cardboard cut into small racquet shapes
  • Markers
  • Balloons
  • Masking tape

Instructions

  • Begin by passing the tennis racquet and tennis ball around the classroom, allowing students to examine each one.
    • What are these items used for?
    • What else would one need to play tennis?
  • Pass out the paper copies of the text lesson to the class, one to each student.
  • Ask the students to take turns reading aloud, one sentence each, from the introduction and the 'What's the Racket About?' section of the text lesson.
    • How is a tennis racquet used?
    • What is our example tennis racquet made of?
    • Do you think this racquet is new or old? Why?
    • What is a tennis court?
    • What is used to divide the court?
    • How does a game of tennis start?
    • What types of strokes are used in the game of tennis?
  • Have students read the 'Game, Set, Match!' section of the text lesson.
    • What is a game in tennis?
    • What is a set?
    • What is a match?
    • How does one win a match in tennis?
  • Have students read the 'Grand Slam: Biggest Stars of the Sport' section of the text lesson.
    • How old is the sport of tennis?
    • What is a grand slam?
    • Can you name some grand slam champions?
  • Have a student read the 'Lesson Summary' section of the text lesson.
  • Review key facts about tennis with the class.
  • Distribute the worksheet to the students.
  • Instruct the students to work independently to complete the worksheet, using what they learned about tennis from the text lesson.
  • When everyone has completed the worksheet, review each question and answer with the class as students follow along checking their work.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register to view this lesson

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Try it risk-free for 30 days

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it risk-free for 30 days!
Create an account
Support