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The Lemonade War Activities

Instructor: Kristen Goode

Kristen has been an educator for 25+ years - as a classroom teacher, a school administrator, and a university instructor. She holds a doctorate in Education Leadership.

'The Lemonade War' is a book written by Jacqueline Davies about dueling lemonade stands. Use the activities in this asset to bring further meaning to the story.

The Lemonade War

The Lemonade War is a children's novel about two siblings who go to battle with their lemonade stands. Their goal is to see who can earn the most money. This is a fun book that can be used to teach a variety of skills. Use the activities below, intended for use with upper elementary students, to encourage learning and to help students connect with this story.

Advertise a Lemonade Stand

Materials: poster board or card stock, markers, small prize

  • Put students into groups of 2-4.
  • Encourage each group to imagine that they are in charge of advertising for one of the lemonade stands in the book.
  • Give each group poster board or card stock and some markers.
  • Instruct students to create a poster to advertise the lemonade stand. Encourage creativity and use of color, graphics, and bold letters.
  • Encourage them to keep in mind the fact that, in the book, there was competition between the two stands, so their advertisement should be as creative and persuasive as possible. Advise them that this will be a competition also and that the group whose poster and 'commercial advertisement' gets the most votes will win a small prize.
  • Once finished, have each group present their posters to the class and also give a brief speech (like a commercial advertisement) to promote the lemonade stand.
  • After all groups have presented their poster, have the students vote on whose lemonade stand they would buy from, based upon their advertising.

Compare and Contrast

Materials: drawing paper, colored pencils

  • Put students into pairs.
  • Give each pair a piece of drawing paper and colored pencils.
  • Instruct each pair to draw a large Venn Diagram on their paper.
  • Have students label the two circles ''Evan'' and ''Jessie.''
  • Next, have each group complete their Venn diagrams comparing and contrasting the two siblings. Have them consider:
    • Physical traits
    • Personality
    • Actions in the story
    • Anything else they can think to compare and contrast
  • Encourage students to use both words and pictures in their diagrams.
  • When complete, allow each group to share their work with the class.

Lemons Game

Materials: writing paper, pencils, timer

  • Put students into groups of 3-4.
  • Give each group a piece of paper and something to write with.
  • Explain the activity.
    • The teacher will set the timer for two minutes.
    • In that two minutes, each group is to list as many ways they can think of that people can use lemons (encourage them to think beyond just desserts and food).
    • After the two minutes, groups will compare their lists.
  • Set the timer for two minutes and announce, ''Go!''
  • Once the time is up, have each group read their lists aloud, one at a time.
  • As each group reads, the rest of the class is to cross out any ideas that are shared (the group that reads is also to cross out any ideas they share with another group).
  • At the end, the group with the most ideas remaining (which will be original to only that group), wins.

Map the Story

Materials: light colored construction paper, colored pencils or markers

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