The Outsiders Gallery Walk Ideas

Instructor: Nora Jarvis

Nora has a Master's degree in teaching, and has taught a variety of elementary grades.

'The Outsiders' by S.E. Hinton is the coming-of-age novel about two rival gangs in the 1960s. You can use these ideas to establish an Outsiders themed gallery walk that will get your students talking.

The Outsiders in a Gallery Walk

A gallery walk can be a great tool to get your students discussing a novel. You might consider having them focus on a particular element of the book, such as characters or quotes, in the gallery walk and then providing different prompts to encourage discussion. The prompts can be posted around the classroom so that your students can wander in small groups, look at the different prompts, and discuss elements featured in the gallery walk.

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton is particularly suited to gallery walks because there are so many characters and plot points that could be discussed. Use the following ideas to get started as you create an Outsider themed gallery walk for your class.

Characters

There are many characters to explore in The Outsiders. A gallery walk is a great opportunity to talk about major characters in greater detail or explore some of the minor characters you might have glossed over in a whole class discussion. Choose a variety of characters from both the Greasers and the Socs.

You might consider using several characters from this list:

  • Ponyboy
  • Sodapop
  • Darry
  • Johnny
  • Two-Bit
  • Dally
  • Cherry
  • Marcia
  • Bob
  • Randy

After you display the different characters, you'll want to include discussion prompts for your students. Possible discussion questions include:

  • What are the best qualities of this character? The worst?
  • How did this character impact events of the plot or other characters?
  • How did the character's point of view affect their behavior?

Themes

There are many themes throughout The Outsiders. Before you set up your gallery walk, it might be helpful to discuss and identify the different themes with your students. You can gear your gallery walk toward the themes that your students seem the most drawn to in order to ensure lively conversations.

Some themes to consider are:

  • Socioeconomic class
  • Violence
  • Injustice
  • Free will
  • Friendship
  • Family
  • Loyalty
  • Belonging

After you've displayed the themes, you should also include discussion questions for your students. Questions to include are:

  • Which plot points of the book relate to this theme?
  • What is the relationship between this theme and the other themes?
  • Which theme is the most important? Why do you think so?

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