Copyright

Treating Your Customers with Respect

An error occurred trying to load this video.

Try refreshing the page, or contact customer support.

Coming up next: Understanding the Value of Customer Complaints

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Take Quiz Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:04 Respect: A Customer…
  • 1:03 Remember the Basics
  • 2:46 When Things Go Bad
  • 3:16 Lesson Summary
Save Save Save

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Log in or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay
Speed Speed
Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Larry Tinker
In this lesson, we will explore some simple ways to show your customer respect. Knowing a few simple ways to show your customer they are important will go a long way in keeping them as a loyal customer.

Respect: A Customer Service Foundation

Treating a customer with respect is not always an easy task, especially when they are upset and have found a way to be 'creative' with their use of the English language. However, whether it is a good situation or bad situation, a customer service representative must always display respect to their customer. Respect is the foundation of customer service excellence.

Customer service call centers across the nation record all of the incoming calls that their Customer Service Representatives (CSRs) handle. Each call is monitored, critiqued and rated to guarantee professionalism and excellence in customer service skills are being displayed by each CSR. Unfortunately, respect cannot be monitored in every business setting. Whether you are in a call center setting, storefront, or office, it is crucial that every customer is given the respect they need to walk away satisfied and happy. That being said, let's go over some ways to ensure you are being respectful to your customers.

Remember the Basics

Think back to when you were a child and learning how to act in a social setting. Perhaps your mother reminded you to look at grandma and grandpa when they spoke to you. Or maybe you had to be reminded to chew with your mouth closed at the dinner table. These are things that need to become second nature to a person in the professional world, as common courtesy seems to have gone to the wayside in our culture. Just like mom's nudges, there may be times when we need some gentle reminders along the way as adults.

Make it your priority to greet the customer in a friendly, inviting manner. If you know their name, be sure to address them personally. Also, do not eat or chew gum during an interaction with a customer. Even on a phone call, one may not realize just how loud it can be. Remember, above all, to always be polite and courteous. Never interrupt the customer during your conversation.

If you are in a face-to-face setting, eye contact shows them they have your undivided attention. Remember, you should never allow incoming personal phone calls, texts, or other employees draw you away from your top priority, the customer. They need to know that you are listening to their needs and concerns.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register to view this lesson

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Try it risk-free for 30 days

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it risk-free for 30 days!
Create an account
Support