Uracil: Definition & Structure

An error occurred trying to load this video.

Try refreshing the page, or contact customer support.

Coming up next: What is Deoxyribonucleic Acid? - Definition & Structure

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Take Quiz Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:02 What Is Uracil?
  • 1:36 Structure of Uracil
  • 2:02 Lesson Summary
Add to Add to Add to

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Login or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay
Speed

Recommended Lessons and Courses for You

Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Derrick Arrington

Derrick has taught biology and chemistry at both the high school and college level. He has a master's degree in science education.

The overall structure of RNA and DNA consists of four nitrogenous bases that compose the backbone of their strands. One of these bases is known as uracil, and is found only in RNA. We will examine uracil's structure and function in this lesson.

What is Uracil?

DNA and RNA are critical to all living things. DNA contains the genetic information that makes every living being what it is and RNA acts as a tool that enables cells to make the proper proteins.

DNA and RNA are in the form of strands of molecules. A strand of DNA is composed of four nitrogenous bases known as adenine, guanine, thymine, and cytosine. RNA is different from DNA because it does not have thymine. Instead, it has a base known as uracil.

Uracil is a colorless, crystalline organic compound that is involved in the transmission of hereditary information. While uracil can bond with all of the other bases, it readily bonds with adenine most often. It is important to note that uracil is a component in several enzymes as well. It aids in the metabolism of complex carbohydrates when part of an enzyme.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register to view this lesson

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Try it risk-free for 30 days

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 160 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it risk-free for 30 days!
Create An Account
Support