Using Logical Consequences in the Classroom: Definition & Examples

Instructor: Kerry Gray

Kerry has been a teacher and an administrator for more than twenty years. She has a Master of Education degree.

In this lesson, we will examine using logical consequences in the classroom. The logical consequences we will discuss include: solving problems, loss of privileges, and time-out.

Definitions

In Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, each of the misbehaving children brought about their own consequences. While they likely learned their lesson, their consequences were not always safe or logical. Logical consequences are methods that are put in place to help students make better behavior choices. While appropriate consequences are adjusted depending on the circumstances and the student, logical consequences are generally divided into three categories. Let's learn more about logical consequences in the classroom.

Solve Problems You Create

One way to teach students to improve their behavior and take responsibility for taking care of each other is to set the expectation that students will fix the problems they cause. The following are examples of logical consequences that solve problems.

  • A student writes on a desk. She spends her free time cleaning all of the desks.
  • A student does not finish his homework. He stays after school to get it done.
  • A student hurts another student's feelings. She writes a letter of apology.
  • A student does not interact correctly with the playground equipment, so he spends a few minutes practicing how to use it correctly.

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