Veterinary Hospital Wards Video

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  • 0:02 Hospital Wards
  • 0:59 What are Hospital Wards for?
  • 2:06 The Isolation Ward
  • 3:36 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Artem Cheprasov
This lesson will define what a veterinary hospital ward is, what kinds of hospital wards there are, what happens in them, and a special kind of hospital ward called the isolation ward.

Hospital Wards

Chances are you have been to a hospital ward before. A hospital ward is an area or room where numerous patients, sometimes segregated by similar medical conditions, are located.

Like human hospitals, some veterinary hospitals have stand-alone hospital wards as well, whereas smaller clinics are more likely to combine their kennels (the boarding facilities) and hospital wards into one area and simply refer to it as something like the 'kennel ward.'

That being said, in very large hospitals, you can expect a hospital ward to be an area reserved solely for patients instead of temporary guests who are not currently patients.

In fact, some hospitals have more than one ward. For instance, there may be the surgery ward, oncology ward, and so on. Oncology is the study of cancer, so cancer patients will be found in an oncology ward.

What Are Hospital Wards For?

Hospital wards will contain patients who are there for a wide variety of reasons. Some will be waiting for a surgical procedure to begin, whereas others will be recovering from one.

Certain patients will be dropped off by their owners in the morning for medical treatment or physiotherapy that will be completed the same day. Physiotherapy, by the way, is just a fancy word for physical therapy. As the patient awaits their turn, they'll be housed in the hospital ward.

And, while their treatments might occur in another area of the hospital, sometimes they occur in the ward itself, depending on circumstances and needs.

In other instances, the patient is dropped off by their owner for a prolonged period of observation in the hospital ward. During this time, serial samples of blood, urine, and other things might be taken to assess a patient's medical condition or progress.

When I say serial, I'm referring to actions that occur in a series as opposed to all at once. For example, blood may need to be drawn for analysis every few hours for a set period of time.

The Isolation Ward

There is also a very special kind of hospital ward that I'd like to discuss before ending this lesson. It is called the isolation ward. The isolation ward is a room in a hospital that contains cages, equipment, and medical supplies used to treat animals that have a contagious disease.

In other words, if the animals have some sort of infection or disease that can be passed on to other animals, or even people, these patients must be segregated in specialized rooms that will help prevent the spread of their disease to other patients in other areas in the hospital.

Let's face it: patients in a hospital are already pretty sick and so it won't take much for them to get sick with something else. That's why in instances where an animal has a contagious disease, that animal is put into the isolation ward.

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