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Vocabulary of Stomach Disorders

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  • 0:01 Diarrhea
  • 0:22 Inflammation & Gastrorrhea
  • 1:37 Peptic Ulcers
  • 3:24 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Artem Cheprasov

Artem has a doctor of veterinary medicine degree.

This lesson defines different types of stomach disorders that are mainly of the inflammatory type. It also covers various peptic ulcers and explains exactly what these ulcers are.

Diarrhea

Diarrhea is a word that stems from the suffix of '-rrhea,' which means 'profuse flow.' Your stomach can have its own kind of diarrhea. You'll learn the word for it later in this lesson. And of course, it's not the only problem the stomach can have. This lesson will define for you several different inflammatory and ulcerative stomach disorders.

Inflammation and Gastrorrhea

Imagine all of a sudden shrinking to a small size and finding yourself inside of your own or someone else's stomach. As you turn on the flashlight in this dark environment and look around, you'll notice that the stomach contains gastric juice and mucus, the latter of which helps protect the stomach from the acid found in gastric juice. But if all of a sudden you almost drown in this mucus or stomach acid, you may be a victim of gastrorrhea, excessive secretion of gastric juice or mucus. 'Gastro-' refers to the stomach, so this is sort of like stomach diarrhea in that there's a profuse outflow of juice and mucus.

And if you scan the walls of the stomach around you with the flashlight only to notice that they are really red and irritated-looking, then this can be an indication of gastritis, the inflammation of the lining of the stomach, commonly as a result of an infection with a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori; '-itis' is a suffix for inflammation. If we find there is inflammation of the stomach and intestines, not just the stomach alone, then we term this gastroenteritis, where 'enter/o' is a combining form for intestines.

Peptic Ulcers

If you keep scanning the stomach with the flashlight, you'll notice these open and painful sores of the lining of the stomach. You see them in this particular case because if gastritis is left untreated, it can lead to the development of peptic ulcers, sores caused by stomach acid, affecting the inner lining of the digestive tract, usually found in the stomach and duodenum, the latter of which is the first part of the intestines that attaches to the stomach. 'Pept-' in 'petic' means 'digestion.'

An ulcer is a deep defect in the inner lining of the gastrointestinal tract, in this case. Gastric ulcers are found in the stomach, while duodenal ulcers are found in the very first part of the intestines. Now, I'll ask you to scan around the stomach one more time for our lesson. Actually, do me a favor and walk around the inside of the stomach looking for another ulcer. As you do this, you fall through the entire thickness of the stomach and into the abdomen.

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