Weekly Behavior Log Template for Students

Instructor: Clio Stearns

Clio has taught education courses at the college level and has a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction.

Using a weekly behavior log can be a good way to keep track of what students are doing well behaviorally, and also the areas where they need the most improvement. This lesson offers a template of a weekly behavior log you can use with students.

Using a Weekly Behavior Log

Are you trying to improve your students' behavior? Whether you are dealing with stark, oppositional behavior or routine problems like missing homework and calling out, having a weekly behavior chart can be a really helpful tool in addressing these issues. A weekly behavior chart is usually used with individual students, though in some cases you might use it with a small group or even your whole class.

Essentially, a weekly behavior chart helps you keep track of the behavioral patterns a student exhibits over the course of the week. It is less minute and detailed than daily behavior charts, but at the end of a week, it will give you, your students, and their families a broad-strokes sense of how a student has done.

Weekly behavior charts can be used to communicate with families, to help students work toward rewards and incentives, or simply to keep track of what is happening with a student's behavior. For instance, you might learn that Wednesdays are especially hard for a student, and this will help you think about solutions and consequences differently.

There is no one right way to create a weekly behavior log, but the template offered in this lesson provides a starting point that you can modify to meet your needs as well as those of your students.

Behavior Log Template

Each section of this template is followed by an explanation as well as an example if relevant.

Heading

Start your log off with a simple heading. It can be great to let the student help you choose the font or any decorations that go with the heading. For instance:

  • Kaylee's Behavior Log
  • Sasha Won't Call Out This Week!

Dates

Leave a space to indicate which dates you are working with. This is especially important if you are using behavior logs to track changes and patterns in students' behavior over time.

Column or Row for Each Day of the Week

Next, you will want to leave one column or row for each day of the week. Usually, this will only include weekdays, but certain behaviors that families are also observing might require you to document all seven days. Write the name of the day, then leave an empty space underneath or beside it for notes on students' behavior that day. In this space, you and any specialists the student works with will be able to jot simple observations of the student's positive and negative behaviors. For example:

  • Monday- Behavior Notes:
  • Tuesday- Behavior Notes:

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