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What is a Frequency Table? - Definition & Examples

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  • 0:02 Using a Frequency Table
  • 1:26 Cats and Dogs
  • 2:42 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Joseph Vigil
In this lesson, learn what a frequency table is and view a few examples of situations in which frequency tables would be useful. Then, test your knowledge with a brief quiz.

Using a Frequency Table

Sue runs a bakery and is trying to cut costs, so she needs to know on which days she can afford to have fewer employees working. In order to figure this out, she needs to know how many customers make a purchase each day. A good tool for Sue to use would be a frequency table, which is a table with a list of items and tally marks recording how often these items occur.

For example, since Sue needs to know how many customers make purchases on a daily basis, she could set up a frequency table by days. Now, she can keep a tally, or a running total, of how many customers come in each day and make purchases. After the week, her completed frequency table looks like this:

completed frequency table

Notice that she also added a frequency column that totals the number of tally marks at the end of each day. This helps her interpret her data quickly.

According to this table, she had 18 customers make a purchase on Monday, 13 on Tuesday, 20 on Wednesday, 14 on Thursday, 21 on Friday, 27 on Saturday, and 26 on Sunday. She can use this data now to decide on which days she'll need the most employees on hand and the days on which she can afford to have fewer employees working.

Cats and Dogs

Let's look at another example.

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