What is a Squeeze Page? - Definition & Examples

Instructor: Beth Hendricks

Beth holds a master's degree in integrated marketing communications, and has worked in journalism and marketing throughout her career.

If you're trying to extricate information from your web visitors, all you need to do is give them a squeeze! In this lesson, we'll cover the basics of a squeeze page and look at a couple of examples.

Making Lemonade

What happens when you squeeze a lemon? The juice is extracted, right?

If you are trying to get information from your web visitors, a squeeze page is the ticket.
squeeze page, squeeze, internet marketing, online marketing

Have you ever felt like someone was squeezing you for information?

What about the squeeze you feel on your wallet every time new bills roll around?

The idea of squeezing means you're trying to get something out of some person or thing: juice from a lemon, information from someone who knows what you don't, or more money from your purse or wallet.

In internet marketing, the term squeeze takes on an entirely new meaning. Curious how this little verb plays into online marketing strategies? Read on to find out.

What is a Squeeze Page?

Have you ever visited a webpage that immediately displayed a pop-up or a splash page offering you a gift of some sort for sharing your email address? If so, you've already got a pretty good idea what a squeeze page is.

On the internet and around digital and online advertising, a squeeze page is a landing page of sorts that offers two primary things: an offer and an opt-in. What we mean by opt-in is that the visitor seeing the squeeze page shares their email address (typically) in exchange for something they want, such as access to the rest of the website, content or a free download. Pop-ups and splash pages are the two most common forms of squeeze pages because these are the pages visitors have to see before venturing further into the website.

The ''squeeze'' behind a squeeze page is the marketers' desire to squeeze visitors for their information, such as an email address. Why? Because once you've gotten a consumer's permission to use their personal data, you have a channel where you can reach them with future marketing messages.

The big advantage of a squeeze page, rather than a newsletter sign-up elsewhere on a website, is that visitors are saying ''yes'' to hearing from you because you have something they want, whether that's a free offer, gift or to be let into the rest of the website. A newsletter sign-up placed in another location on a website may get overlooked or lost in the shuffle.

If you don't like the term squeeze page, maybe you'd prefer capture page, because that's what you're trying to do -- capture information about who is checking out your website. More than that, you want to be able to contact them with additional emails and ultimately convert them into a customer.

The Makeup of a Squeeze Page

If the idea of building a squeeze page intimidates you, don't fret. Squeeze pages are inherently simple because the goal is twofold: capture information and provide the requested access.

So, all you really need is:

1. A great offer. Do you have a website with rock-bottom prices or a how-to guide for something you're an expert in? Whatever the offer, make it juicy and make it relevant to your brand and your audience.

2. Strong text. You don't have to write a book here, but it should be intriguing enough to make people take the time to read it and complete the offer. Don't forget a catchy headline.

3. A good call to action. Your call to action is the button users can click to download the offer. It should stand out and make it clear what your guest will get once they click it.

4. The squeeze for information. Whatever you decide to collect (and it's best to be brief), be sure you've created fill-ins for that information, such as first and last name and email address.

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