What is ASP.NET MVC? - Examples & Basics

Instructor: David Gloag
The Internet and its associated content are very important to the world. In this lesson, we'll take a look at ASP.NET and MVC. We will learn what there are, how they are related, and look at an example that includes both.

The Magic of the Internet

To some, the Internet is a magical place. It provides information when we need to figure things out, a way to purchase items from the comfort of our homes, and entertainment when we're bored out of our minds. In some ways, it seems to have a life of its own. So, how does it do that? How does the Internet adjust to our wants and needs? There are a number of things that come into play, most of which are technology-based. One, in particular, provides a significant contribution. It is called ASP.NET.

What is ASP.NET?

.NET is a development tool, a framework or platform, released by Microsoft, whose purpose is to provide a set of common capabilities across a number of devices and operating systems. ASP.NET, or Active Server Pages.NET, is a technology, also created by Microsoft, that makes use of .NET capabilities to provide dynamic content on the Internet. By dynamic, we mean content that adjusts to the circumstances in which it was requested. Consider a webpage that displays weather information. At the time it is created, the information is current and accurate. Over time, however, the information becomes dated, and in need of an update. This would require the webpage to be redesigned, a tedious process at best. Using ASP.NET, the webpage can automatically update, meaning that the page only has to be created once.

What is MVC?

MVC is an architectural pattern known as Model-View-Controller. It breaks the internals of a software application down into pieces, each falling into one of three categories:

  • Model - This piece is where the information resides. Often this is a database, but it could be as simple as a file. In an application like Microsoft Word, this would be the document you are working on.
  • View - This piece is what the user sees on their monitor. Technically, it's the logic behind what is seen, the part that draws the screens. In Microsoft Word, this would be the written words on the displayed page.
  • Controller - This piece is the logic for the application, the part that performs any needed processing. In Microsoft Word, this would be the program code that performs the operations that Word can provide.

Pictorially, the organization of the pieces looks like this:

MVC Pattern Example
MVC

In the diagram, the solid lines indicate direct access to the information contained in the piece (read and write). Dashed lines indicate indirect access (read only).

How is MVC Related to ASP.NET?

MVC is related to ASP.NET in much the same way as it is related to an application. ASP.NET is embedded into the HTML code that generates most of the webpages you see on the Internet. In other words, the View portion of MVC. ASP.NET is executed on the remote server, which is the Controller portion of MVC. And, ASP.NET provides data access capabilities which are the Model portion of MVC. The only real difference is the distances involved. The Internet is worldwide. The View portion exists on your personal computer, the Model portion resides on some remote server, and the Controller portion also resides on some remote server. That is the nature of the Internet. An application is usually restricted to your personal computer.

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