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Why is Voting Important? - Lesson for Kids

Instructor: Jennifer Lowery

Jennifer has taught elementary levels K-3 and has master's degrees in elementary education and curriculum/instruction and educational leadership.

Voting is an important process in our country through which leaders are selected to make laws and solve problems. In this lesson, explore the history of voting, discover why it is important to vote, and learn why you should vote in every election.

Time to Vote!

Do you ever notice commercials or advertisements for people who want you to vote for them? You've probably seen quite a few, especially every four years when a new president is elected. But have you ever stopped to think about the voting process and why it is important? Let's learn why everyone should vote, and how it can change the way you live.

What Are Elections?

An election is when leaders are chosen for public offices or jobs by voters. Elections can be held for people who have local jobs. An example of a local leader is a mayor, who works to help make life better for people living in their town or city. There are also elections for state and national leaders, like your state's governor.

So where do people go to vote? There are sites called polling places, which are usually public buildings like schools or libraries where people who live close by can come and vote.

Polling places are sites where people in local neighborhoods come to vote in elections.
voting

Voting History

Can you imagine a time when certain groups of people were not allowed to vote? Sadly, this happened in our country not very long ago. Up until 1920, only white men were allowed to vote. However, women and African Americans fought for the right to vote, which is often referred to as suffrage. So while everyone should vote, it is especially important that women and African Americans vote today, to honor those who fought hard for this right.

Women and African Americans initially were not allowed to vote, but many leaders worked hard to get this changed.
suffrage

Voting Can Improve Communities

Imagine a school building, maybe the one where you are a student. Who decided to construct this building? Who decided that you would go to this particular school? Local leaders made these decisions, and they are people who are voted into these jobs. When you vote, you get to have a say in who these leaders are. You can also choose state and national leaders, who make laws that improve the lives of people living in their state.

Congress and the President of the United States are chosen by voters, and they make laws for citizens of the country.
Congress

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