Homeschool vs. Public School Statistics

Why Some Families Choose Homeschooling

According to a study completed in 2011, 3.4% of school-aged children in the United States were educated at home. Of these 1,770,000 students, 25% of their parents decided to homeschool based on concerns about the environment of other schools. Other reasons for homeschooling included: non-educational (family, travel, financial) reasons (21%); dissatisfaction with instruction at other schools (19%); and religious instructional needs (16%).

SAT Scores

Taking the ACT and/or the SAT is a milestone in a high school student's academic life and the results of these tests are usually part of the college application package. Students in public high schools are often guided through this process as part of their academic program, but in a homeschool situation, it is up to the parent to provide the student the necessary materials to study for and satisfactorily complete these tests.

How do home-educated students fare on the SAT? While the test doesn't categorize homeschooling specifically in their data sets, homeschoolers would be placed in the broader category of 'Private-Independent Schools'. According to 2014 SAT results, 84% of test-takers were enrolled in public high schools while 7% were enrolled in independent private schools. The remaining test-takers (9%) were enrolled in religious private schools. The results for public and independent private schools are as follows:

Public School Independent Private School
Critical Reading Score492535
Mathematics Score501580
Writing Score478542

Source: National Center for Education Statistics

College-bound students in public, private, and home school environments can benefit greatly from brushing up on their knowledge and test-taking skills. Study.com offers a number of engaging video courses to assist them in this endeavor, such as:

ACT Prep

SAT Prep

College Success

Taking the ACT and/or the SAT is just the first step on the road to college. College admissions and success are dependent on a number of factors including GPA, study skills, and socioeconomic factors. Many colleges now accept homeschoolers and many, like Stanford University, eagerly recruit them.

If your teenager is getting close to making college plans, Study.com offers a number of insightful and informative lessons to help make this process a little easier, including:

Homeschooling is hard enough as it is, but balancing the needs of children of different ages makes the challenge all the more difficult. This blog post offers suggestions for how you can succeed when homeschooling your entire family.

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