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Paragraph Writing Rubrics

Instructor: Shelby Golden
Rubrics for paragraph writing can prove very useful in the classroom. Learn how to find or design these rubrics for your classroom to help your students.

What's a Paragraph Writing Rubric?

In general, rubrics make it easy for students to understand class expectations and allow you to easily and fairly grade writing projects. Though writing rubrics layout can differ from teacher to teacher, most include columns with potential scores and rows with scoring criteria. In this case, possible criteria include the main idea, supporting sentences, detail sentences, legibility and mechanics and grammar. Most rubrics also include space to add up student scores and leave comments. You can find out more about the best ways to integrate rubrics into your classroom with the lesson How to Use Rubrics for Literacy Instruction.

Here's an example of a common paragraph writing rubric:

4 3 2 1 Score
Main Topic Strong main idea
restated in the closing sentence
Adequate main idea
restated in the closing sentence
Weakly stated main idea
weakly restated in closing sentence
Unclear main idea
not restated in closing sentence
Supporting Sentences Three or more supporting
sentences per paragraph
Two supporting sentences
per paragraph
One supporting sentence
per paragraph
No supporting sentences
Grammar Few, if any, errors Several errors that
do not interfere with meaning
Many errors that
interfere with meaning
Many errors that
make it illegible

Where to Find Paragraph Writing Rubrics

You have several options available for finding paragraph writing rubrics for your classroom. Many templates can be found through a simple web search at websites such as StudyZone (www.studyzone.org) and Teach-nology (teachers.teach-nology.com). These pre-made rubrics offer a quick way to begin using this tool in your classroom.

Make Your Own

However, pre-made rubrics may not perfectly fit your class or teaching style. If this is the case, you can design your own. You can find the information you need to get started in the lesson General Project and Writing Rubric. You can also view the lesson Paragraphs: Definition & Rules to make sure you have a handle on exactly what you're trying to teach your students.

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