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Sounds Experiments Lesson for Kids

Instructor: Shelby Golden
These experiments can help kids learn more about sound while having fun. Read this article for directions on several experiments and to find out more about additional learning opportunities.

Do You Hear What I Hear?

This simple experiment can help students focus on how they hear sounds. The only thing they'll need is a group of people and their hands. Have one student stand in the center of the others and close his or her eyes. The other students will then take turns clapping as the student in the center tries to point them out using only the sense of sound.

You can continue this experiment by having the listening student cover one ear to see how that affects hearing. Your students can learn more about how the ear picks up sound with this lesson on how the ear works.

Balloon Aids

Kids can explore how sound is amplified with this experiment.

Give each pair of students an inflated balloon. Have one student hold the balloon up to his or her ear while the other student taps on the other side of the balloon. Though the taps are light, the kids should be able to hear them loudly. This is because the air molecules are in a tightly packed space, which makes balloons great conductors for sound.

Help your students learn more about sound and how it's transmitted with this lesson, titled What is Sound?

Sound Waves

Use this experiment to help your students understand how sound travels. You'll need these supplies:

  • A bowl
  • Plastic wrap
  • Rubber band
  • Pepper

Begin by covering the bowl with the plastic wrap. Secure the wrap in place with the rubber band and sprinkle pepper on the top. Finally, invite your students or children to make some noise! Louder noises should really make the pepper vibrate and bounce, demonstrating the vibrations created by sound. Students can learn even more about this subject with this lesson on pitch and volume in sound waves.

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