American Revolution Poems: Lesson for Kids

Instructions:

Choose an answer and hit 'next'. You will receive your score and answers at the end.

question 1 of 3

A tribute is something meant to _____ someone or something.

Create Your Account To Take This Quiz

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access

1. The colonist were fighting against Britain to gain their _____.

2. The Concord Hymn was a poem written by _____.

Create your account to access this entire worksheet
A Premium account gives you access to all lesson, practice exams, quizzes & worksheets
Access to all video lessons
Quizzes, practice exams & worksheets
Certificate of Completion
Access to instructors
Create an account to get started Create Account

About This Quiz & Worksheet

Work through the quiz and worksheet to see how much you know about American Revolution poems. What Paul Revere did and who wrote the Concord Hymn are two of the topics on the multiple-choice quiz.

Quiz & Worksheet Goals

You can see how much you know about:

  • Why Phillis Wheatley was famous
  • The meaning of the word 'tribute'
  • Why the colonists fought against Britain
  • The writer of the Concord Hymn

Skills Practiced

  • Reading awareness - make sure that you know the most important details from the lesson on American Revolution poetry
  • Remembering details - remember what you learned about why Paul Revere was famous
  • Learning practice - use what you learned to answer questions about famous American Revolution poets

Additional Learning

Learn more about these poems and poets by using the lesson called American Revolution Poems: Lesson for Kids. Use this lesson to:

  • See when the American Revolution happened
  • Determine why Concord Hymn was important
  • Review famous poems written about historical events
  • Explore what Philip Freneau wrote
Support