Primary Source: The Missouri Compromise

Instructions:

Choose an answer and hit 'next'. You will receive your score and answers at the end.

question 1 of 3

Why didn't Congress write the Missouri Compromise to explicitly say that slavery would be legal in the state?

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1. Why was the Mississippi River a ''common highway'' in the Missouri Compromise?

2. According to the Missouri Compromise, Missouri voters could choose representatives, selected proportionately from each county, for what purpose?

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About This Quiz & Worksheet

If you're in the process of studying the Missouri Compromise, this quiz and worksheet can check your ability to analyze the text of this legislation. Questions cover a variety of topics, including the legality of slavery in Missouri, use of a census to establish the number of congressional representatives for Missouri and a legal provision of American slavery in the Missouri Compromise.

Quiz & Worksheet Goals

Find out how much you know about the following using this quiz and worksheet:

  • Reason Congress didn't write the Missouri Compromise to say slavery would be legal in the state
  • Purpose for which Missouri voters could choose representatives, selected proportionately from each county
  • Reason the Mississippi River was deemed a common highway in the Missouri Compromise
  • Legal provision of American slavery in the Missouri Compromise focused on reclaiming slaves who escaped to non-slave states
  • Reason the government needed to conduct a census to establish a number of congressional representatives for Missouri

Skills Practiced

  • Knowledge application - use your knowledge to answer a question about the Mississippi River being called a common highway in the Missouri Compromise
  • Information recall - access the knowledge you've gained regarding Missouri not explicitly being called a slave state and a reason that the government did not need to conduct a census to establish the number of senators for Missouri
  • Reading comprehension - read and pull essential information from the accompanying lesson covering the text of the Missouri Compromise

Additional Learning

Accompanying this quiz and worksheet is an engaging lesson called Primary Source: The Missouri Compromise. Study this lesson to build a quality understanding of the following:

  • How the Missouri Compromise met the government's need to ensure balance between the free and slave states
  • President who signed the Missouri Compromise into law
  • Concern many politicians and journalists had about the Missouri Compromise when signed
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