Primary Source: Passage of the 14th Amendment by the US Senate on June 9, 1866

Instructions:

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An article in the Philadelphia Evening Telegraph reported on the passage of the 14th Amendment. Why would the author suggest that an affirmative vote by three-quarters of the Senate would be an ''unexpectedly large'' vote?

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1. An article in the Philadelphia Evening Telegraph reported on the passage of the 14th Amendment. What is the misconception discussed about the President vetoing the amendment?

2. According to an article in the Philadelphia Evening Telegraph on the passage of the 14th Amendment, what is the alternative to Congress proposing and passing an amendment?

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About This Quiz & Worksheet

Use of this five-question quiz and worksheet is a fast way to assess what you know about the passage of the 14th Amendment by the Senate on June 9, 1866. Among other details, you should be familiar with an article in the Philadelphia 'Evening Telegraph' about the passage of this amendment and a veto by the President.

Quiz & Worksheet Goals

You'll be quizzed on the following topics covered in the Philadelphia 'Evening Telegraph':

  • 'Unexpectedly large' affirmative vote on the 14th Amendment
  • Misconception about the President vetoing this amendment
  • Alternative to Congress proposing and passing an amendment
  • Contrast between 'intelligent leading traitors' and 'humble and seduced masses'
  • Abraham Lincoln signing the anti-slavery Amendment

Skills Practiced

  • Making connections - use what you've learned to make connections between passage of the 14th Amendment and an 'unexpectedly large' vote
  • Interpreting information - verify that you can read information about the anti-slavery Amendment and interpret it correctly
  • Distinguishing differences - compare and contrast topics from the lesson, such as 'intelligent leading traitors' and 'humble and seduced masses'

Additional Learning

You can learn even more about this topic by studying the lesson titled Primary Source: Passage of the 14th Amendment by the US Senate on June 9, 1866. Here's a quick look at topics covered:

  • An overview of the 14th Amendment
  • What caused the debt of the Confederacy
  • The Senate's modification of the amendment
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