Class in Pride and Prejudice: Explanation & Examples

Instructions:

Choose an answer and hit 'next'. You will receive your score and answers at the end.

question 1 of 3

Which of the following characters in Pride and Prejudice does not own their home?

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1. As depicted in Pride and Prejudice, which of the following markers of class was of increasing importance in Regency Era Britain?

2. In Pride and Prejudice, what change did Sir William Lucas make as a result of receiving a knighthood?

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About This Quiz & Worksheet

Socioeconomic class plays a critical role in the characterization of British culture during the Victorian era. To successfully pass this quiz, you will need a firm grasp of the socioeconomic critiques apparent in Pride and Prejudice.

Quiz & Worksheet Goals

To prove you fully grasp Jane Austen's seminal novel, you will be quizzed on:

  • The property ownership of characters in the novel
  • Markers of class status
  • How the wealth of specific characters inspired their actions

Skills Practiced

  • Critical thinking - apply the concept of class consciousness to the character development of Pride and Prejudice
  • Interpreting information - verify that you can read information regarding the connection between socioeconomic class and cultural prestige as portrayed in the book
  • Reading comprehension - ensure that you draw the most important information from the actions of specific characters from the novel

Additional Learning

To learn more on this topic, please review the accompanying lesson titled Class in Pride and Prejudice: Explanations & Examples. The lesson covers:

  • Regency-era Britain
  • Connected variables of income, family, and living circumstances
  • The paradox of Sir William Lucas
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