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Voting: Costs and Benefits Video

Instructions:

Choose an answer and hit 'next'. You will receive your score and answers at the end.

question 1 of 3

Which general principle assumes that people make logical decisions that provide them with the greatest benefit in their best self-interest?

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1. When choosing whether or not to vote, we assume voters weigh the sacrifices against the advantages, which is known as:

2. We can't expect everyone to vote. However, if everyone stops believing in the power of voting, the democratic process ceases. This is an example of which principle?

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About This Quiz & Worksheet

Use this quiz/worksheet combo to help you test your understanding of the costs and benefits of voting. Some of the material you'll be assessed on includes reasons eligible voters choose not to vote and the principle that warns us that if everyone stops believing in the power of voting, the democratic process ceases.

Quiz & Worksheet Goals

In these assessments you'll be tested on:

  • General principle that assumes people make logical decisions that provide them with the greatest benefit and are in their best self-interest
  • Weighing the sacrifices against the advantages when choosing whether to vote
  • Reason experts say that voting in the presidential election doesn't provide much benefit to the individual participant

Skills Practiced

This quiz and worksheet allow students to test the following skills:

  • Reading comprehension - ensure that you draw the most important information from the related political science lesson
  • Information recall - access the knowledge you've gained regarding key principles related to voting
  • Knowledge application - use your knowledge to identify reasons eligible voters choose not to vote

Additional Learning

To learn more about voting, review the accompanying lesson titled Voting: Costs and Benefits. This lesson covers the following objectives:

  • Define the term 'costs and benefits' as it relates to voting
  • Identify least five reasons people choose not to vote
  • Describe the rational choice theory and compare/contrast it to the paradox of participation theory
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