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General Winfield Scott and the Civil War

Instructions:

Choose an answer and hit 'next'. You will receive your score and answers at the end.

question 1 of 3

Which of the following wars did Winfield Scott NOT take part in?

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1. During which war was Winfield Scott held as a prisoner of war?

2. Which political party nominated Scott to run for president in 1852?

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About This Quiz & Worksheet

The following quiz and worksheet will display your knowledge of General Winfield Scott and his impact on the Civil War.

Quiz & Worksheet Goals

During the assessments, you will be tested on:

  • Scott being held as a prisoner of war
  • The party that nominated him for a presidential bid in 1852
  • His influence during the Civil War
  • Who took over for Scott as Union general-in-chief

Skills Practiced

  • Information recall - access the knowledge you've gained regarding Scott's early military career
  • Knowledge application - use your knowledge to answer questions about his contributions in the Civil War
  • Interpreting information - verify that you can read information regarding who succeeded Scott and interpret it correctly

Additional Learning

To learn more about Scott's contributions, read the lesson called General Winfield Scott and the Civil War. This lesson covers the following objectives:

  • Detail Scott becoming an artillery captain in 1808
  • Explain his role in the Battle of Queenston Heights
  • Cover his tenure as Union general-in-chief
  • Explore his retirement in 1861 and his death in 1866
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