Mixed Receptive-Expressive Language Disorder: Treatment

Instructions:

Choose an answer and hit 'next'. You will receive your score and answers at the end.

question 1 of 3

There are two types of mixed receptive-expressive language disorders: development and acquired. What is the main difference between the two?

Create Your Account To Take This Quiz

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access

1. You are a preschool teacher with a class of eight four-year-olds. You notice that one of your students has trouble cleaning up when you give verbal directions and sing the 'clean up song.' This child's language is also immature compared to the other four-year-olds in your class. What is the first step you should take in addressing these issues with the parents?

2. True or False: All individuals with mixed expressive-receptive language disorder should receive the same therapy.

Create your account to access this entire worksheet
A Premium account gives you access to all lesson, practice exams, quizzes & worksheets
Access to all video lessons
Quizzes, practice exams & worksheets
Certificate of Completion
Access to instructors
Create an account to get started Create Account

About This Quiz & Worksheet

The quiz and worksheet will evaluate your understanding of mixed receptive-expressive language disorder. In order to pass the quiz, you should study the difference between the types of receptive-expressive language disorders and if all people with this disorder should receive the same therapy.

Quiz & Worksheet Goals

In these assessments you'll be tested on:

  • How to address issues with parents if there are red flags for a language disorder
  • How to phrase things so that a child with mixed expressive-receptive language disorder can follow requests
  • Difference between developmental and acquired mixed receptive-expressive language disorders
  • Most recommended treatment for an individual with this type of a language disorder
  • Whether or not individuals with this language disorder should have the same therapy

Skills Practiced

  • Interpreting information - verify that you can read information regarding mixed-expressive receptive language disorders
  • Information recall - access the knowledge you've gained regarding how to phrase things so that a child with mixed expressive-receptive language disorder can follow requests
  • Knowledge application - use your knowledge to answer a question about how to address issues with parents if there are red flags for a language disorder

Additional Learning

If you would like to learn more about language disorders, check out the related lesson called Mixed Receptive-Expressive Language Disorder: Treatment. The lesson was designed to help you:

  • Learn about what a mixed receptive-expressive language disorder is
  • Distinguish the differences between developmental mixed receptive-expressive language disorder and acquired mixed receptive- expressive language disorder
  • Review the symptoms that are seen with this language disorder
  • Identify the difficulties people have with this language disorder such as limited vocabulary and trouble following directions
  • Know the different ways a mixed receptive-expressive language disorder can be treated
  • Describe the tips that can help teachers and parents who have students with this language disorder
Support