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How Continents & Oceans Influence Global Pressure Distribution Video

Instructions:

Choose an answer and hit 'next'. You will receive your score and answers at the end.

question 1 of 3

Where in the atmosphere is air pressure the highest?

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1. What causes the air surrounding Earth's atmosphere to form wind patterns moving away from the equator and towards the poles?

2. What type of weather is typically associated with low pressure systems?

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About This Quiz & Worksheet

Use this quiz and worksheet at any time to assess your knowledge of oceanic and continental impact on global pressure distribution. The quiz questions will surround the topic of air pressure in the atmosphere.

Quiz & Worksheet Goals

Topics on the quiz include:

  • Low pressure systems
  • Specific heat capacity
  • Wind patterns
  • Air pressure

Skills Practiced

The following skills will be assessed:

  • Interpreting information - based on the material, interpret what type of weather is associated with low pressure systems
  • Knowledge application - apply your knowledge of air pressure to the atmosphere
  • Making connections - link your understanding of wind patterns with what causes them to move away from the equator

Additional Learning

Examine more about air pressure and wind patterns using the lesson entitled How Continents & Oceans Influence Global Pressure Distribution. This tutorial will address:

  • Coriolis Effect
  • Convection
  • High pressure systems
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