States Rights & the Civil War

Instructions:

Choose an answer and hit 'next'. You will receive your score and answers at the end.

question 1 of 3

What did the Missouri Compromise accomplish in 1820?

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1. What piece of legislation was the Fugitive Slave Act a part of?

2. The election of what president did the South take as an assault on its power and authority?

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About This Quiz & Worksheet

During the Civil War, there were many arguments about states' rights and the federal government. We've put together a multiple-choice quiz to test your understanding of key subjects including the Missouri Compromise in 1820 and the Fugitive Slave Act.

Quiz & Worksheet Goals

This quiz/worksheet will cover the following:

  • The year Abraham Lincoln was elected president
  • States' rights and how they function
  • The reason some people believe the Civil War was about states' rights

Skills Practiced

  • Knowledge application - use your knowledge to answer questions about states' rights and the federal government during the Civil War
  • Information recall - access the knowledge you've gained regarding the Missouri Compromise in 1820 and the year when Lincoln became the U.S. President
  • Making connections - use your understanding of the Fugitive Slave Act to recognize the other piece of legislation it was connected to

Additional Learning

There's an accompanying lesson named States Rights & the Civil War that will teach you more about the following areas of interest:

  • Slavery as the main cause of the Civil War in America
  • Examples of states' rights and how they were debated
  • Fighting that broke out between the Union North and the Confederate South
  • Free states versus slave states
  • Beliefs of the Federalists and anti-federalists
  • Argument over South Carolina's Fort Sumter
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