Ch 8: 10th Grade English: Nonfiction Text Analysis

About This Chapter

These quick, easy lessons assist students in analyzing nonfiction texts as demonstrated in Thoreau's ''Civil Disobedience'' and more. These lessons are useful for test prep, remedial work, or simply for personal enrichment.

10th Grade English: Nonfiction Text Analysis - Chapter Summary

Students can use these lessons to expand their analytical abilities concerning nonfiction and informational texts. The lessons teach students how to identify the main point in a text, the similarities and differences between fact, persuasion and informed opinion, and much more.

Readily accessible 24/7/365 via any internet-capable device, this study platform makes learning interesting, fun and convenient. The lessons are well-written and engaging, so boredom is never an issue. Lesson quizzes and a test at the end of the chapter allow students to check their retention and mastery, and the Dashboard keeps them on track. Students will learn how to:

  • Define and explain an implied main idea
  • Use supporting details to explain the main point
  • Examine structure and sequence of events in informational texts
  • Explain how supplemental features can enhance informational texts
  • Compare and contrast fact vs. persuasion vs. informed opinion in nonfiction
  • Summarize and analyze Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau and Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King, Jr.

8 Lessons in Chapter 8: 10th Grade English: Nonfiction Text Analysis
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

1. Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

What's the point? If you're having trouble answering this question, you might need to learn more about implied main ideas. This lesson gives a definition and examples, along with explanations on how to identify them!

How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

2. How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the supporting details that explain the main idea being presented in a piece of literature. You will also learn different strategies that can be applied to future questions about the main idea.

Analyzing Sequence of Events in an Informational Text

3. Analyzing Sequence of Events in an Informational Text

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the different types of sequencing of events from non-fiction, informational text. You will learn how to use context clues and make inferences about the ordering of events in a text.

Analyzing Structure in an Informational Text

4. Analyzing Structure in an Informational Text

In this lesson, we examine several of the most common structures that an informational text might use and the different ways each structure helps an author create an argument or deliver their message.

How Supplemental Features Add to an Informational Text

5. How Supplemental Features Add to an Informational Text

Informational texts are nonfiction writings that inform the audience about a topic. To help organize these texts, supplemental features are used. These include print features, organizational aids, and visuals.

Fact vs. Persuasion vs. Informed Opinion in Nonfiction

6. Fact vs. Persuasion vs. Informed Opinion in Nonfiction

How do you know what to believe and what to doubt? Watch this video lesson to learn how to differentiate between facts, persuasion, and informed opinions.

Letter from Birmingham Jail: Summary & Analysis

7. Letter from Birmingham Jail: Summary & Analysis

Martin Luther King, Jr. takes on and beats nine tough criticisms in his 'Letter from Birmingham Jail.' Discover the hidden structure and radical rhetorical power of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s most widely-read text.

Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience: Summary and Analysis

8. Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience: Summary and Analysis

Henry David Thoreau wrote the essay Civil Disobedience to show his opposition to slavery and American imperialism. His essay has influenced many prominent civil rights activists, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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