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Ch 1: 10th Grade English: Reading Skills

About This Chapter

Through these lessons, students can build reading, literary analysis, and summarization skills. These lessons can help students in making up for missed classes, acquiring credits for college entry, and more.

10th Grade English: Reading Skills - Chapter Summary

This chapter helps students improve and expand their reading skills, including their abilities to evaluate texts, find central ideas, make comparisons between texts, and more. Brief, yet informative and interesting lessons make learning easy and fun, while the convenient online format allows students to study whenever their schedules permit. These lessons are accessible from any Internet-ready device; students can even study using their smartphones! By working through these lessons, students study how to:

  • Make inferences and draw conclusions
  • Correctly cite text evidence
  • Compare and analyze related texts
  • Identify the theme or central idea
  • Analyze a text's purpose
  • Summarize a story objectively
  • Pinpoint details in a text
  • Use visualization for reading comprehension

9 Lessons in Chapter 1: 10th Grade English: Reading Skills
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

1. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

2. Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

When someone drops hints, we're able to draw conclusions about what they're really trying to say. Similarly, as readers, we use clues to draw conclusions from texts. This lesson explains how to draw conclusions and how to teach this important skill.

Citing Textual Evidence to Support Analysis

3. Citing Textual Evidence to Support Analysis

In this lesson, we're going to learn how to analyze a text and cite evidence to support an analysis. We'll also learn the difference between quotations, paraphrases, and summaries, and we'll talk about how to give credit where credit is due.

How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

4. How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the theme or central idea of a text, and you'll get some specific examples of themes from famous stories.

How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

5. How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze two texts related by theme or topic. We will discuss how to analyze the texts individually and then how to synthesize their information.

Writing an Objective Summary of a Story

6. Writing an Objective Summary of a Story

In this lesson, you'll learn exactly what teachers mean when they ask for an objective summary, and you'll learn how to write one as well. Finally, you can test your understanding with a short quiz.

How to Analyze the Purpose of a Text

7. How to Analyze the Purpose of a Text

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze the purpose of a text. We will explore some of the primary purposes and practice determining purpose using some writing samples.

Finding Specific Details in a Reading Selection

8. Finding Specific Details in a Reading Selection

Ever have trouble finding a specific detail in a reading selection? Often knowing the structure of the selection will help. This video lesson will give some strategies for finding specific details depending on selection structure.

Reading Strategies Using Visualization

9. Reading Strategies Using Visualization

In this lesson, we will define visualization. We will then discuss why this step is important, how we can visualize, and when you should visualize. Finally, we will look at a sample from a poem and practice visualizing.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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