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Ch 5: 6th Grade Language Arts: Sentence Types & Components

About This Chapter

Bad writing starts with bad sentences, which the lessons in this chapter teach students to avoid. These videos explore the finer points of sentence types and components with fun videos, in-depth instruction, and quizzes to measure progress.

6th Grade Language Arts: Sentence Types & Components - Chapter Summary

Every student who thought learning about sentences was boring will bite their tongues after watching these videos. The instructors expertly pick apart sentences with charming and entertaining videos on the subject. The videos are complemented by a transcript of the lesson with key terms set in bold type for easy reference and with a brief quiz to gauge your student's understanding of the material. After reviewing all of the lessons, students can take the chapter exam to see how much they've learned. Or, if they would like, they can take the exam first and see exactly where they need to focus to improve on the things they learned in class.

Chapter Lessons and Objectives

Lesson Objective
Exclamatory Sentence: Definition & Examples Students learn how books can yell, with or without an exclamation mark.
Declarative Sentence: Definition & Examples Declarations say things as they are, as our instructors show in this lesson.
Interrogative Sentence: Definition & Examples Every sentence has a question in this video, showing students how to craft a good interrogative sentence.
Imperative Sentence: Definition & Examples Students are taught how to make demands in writing.
Types of Sentence: Simple, Compound, & Complex Instructors dispel any confusion around the three basic sentence types and how they are defined by their clauses.
Sentence Parts: Subject, Predicate, Object, & Clauses Before they get into the complex aspects of sentences, instructors lay the foundations for sentences in this lesson.
How to Identify the Subject of a Sentence As with sentences, there are simple, complex, and compound subjects, and this video shows how to pick them out.
What are Predicates? - Definition and Examples Students learn to identify and build predicates, including complete predicates and predicate nominatives.
Compound Predicate: Definition, Examples & Quiz In this lesson predicates get a little trickier, and students learn how to find their way through the tangle.
Sentence Fragments, Comma Splices and Run-on Sentences This video describes how to find and eliminate these pesky stylistic annoyances.
Varied Sentence Structure in Writing Here students are taught how to vary sentence structures to make their writing more readable.
Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences Well-balanced sentences are the subject of this video, with cameos of sasquatch, vampires, and a ninja.
What are Misplaced Modifiers and Dangling Modifiers? In this entertaining lesson, missing subjects are found so their modifiers don't dangle and misplaced modifiers find their way home.

8 Lessons in Chapter 5: 6th Grade Language Arts: Sentence Types & Components
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Types of Sentences: Simple, Compound & Complex

1. Types of Sentences: Simple, Compound & Complex

Sentences can be categorized as simple, compound, and complex. In this lesson, you'll learn about all three, break down example sentences, and test yourself at the end with a short quiz.

Parts of a Sentence: Subject, Predicate, Object & Clauses

2. Parts of a Sentence: Subject, Predicate, Object & Clauses

Some of the most basic sentence parts are subjects, predicates, objects, and clauses. In this lesson, you'll define these parts, learn how they function in sentences and discover why that knowledge is important for the AP test.

How to Identify the Subject of a Sentence

3. How to Identify the Subject of a Sentence

Don't pass over this lesson! You may think you know how to find subjects and verbs in a sentence, but picking them out can be harder than you think. Identifying subjects and verbs is the first step to unlocking nearly everything else about English composition.

What are Predicates? - Definition and Examples

4. What are Predicates? - Definition and Examples

A predicate is a necessary component of each sentence, so it's important to know what one is and how to identify one. This lesson goes over the basics of predicates as well as how knowing about them can help answer other grammatical questions.

Sentence Fragments, Comma Splices and Run-on Sentences

5. Sentence Fragments, Comma Splices and Run-on Sentences

Sentence fragments, comma splices, and run-on sentences are grammatical and stylistic bugs that can seriously derail an otherwise polished academic paper. Learn how to identify and eliminate these errors in your own writing here.

Varied Sentence Structure in Writing

6. Varied Sentence Structure in Writing

Learn the meaning of sentence structure and the importance of varying sentence structure in writing in this lesson. Four strategies to help you vary your sentence structure will also be described.

Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

7. Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

Sentences that aren't parallel sound funny, even if they look perfectly correct at first glance. Learn what makes a sentence parallel, how to revise a sentence to make it parallel, and how to write beautiful, balanced sentences of your own.

What Are Misplaced Modifiers and Dangling Modifiers?

8. What Are Misplaced Modifiers and Dangling Modifiers?

I have this recurring nightmare where all my modifiers are misplaced or dangling and everybody's laughing at me. Don't let this happen to you! Learn why modifiers are important and why putting them in the right place is even more so.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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