Ch 7: 9th Grade Dramatic Literature: Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Dramatic Literature chapter of this 9th Grade English Homework Help course helps students complete their dramatic literature homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your dramatic literature homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample questions and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your dramatic literature homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Drama terms, time periods and styles
  • History and elements of drama
  • Tragedy and comedy in drama
  • Melodrama and epic theatre
  • Futurism, dada, surrealism and expressionism
  • Theaters of cruelty and the absurd
  • Analysis of dramatic works

14 Lessons in Chapter 7: 9th Grade Dramatic Literature: Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Drama? - Terms, Time Periods and Styles

1. What is Drama? - Terms, Time Periods and Styles

Drama is a genre of writing that can be performed for theatre, movies, radio, or television programs. Learn about the terms, history, time periods, and styles of dramatic writing.

History of Drama: Dramatic Movements and Time Periods

2. History of Drama: Dramatic Movements and Time Periods

The genesis of theater can be traced back to primitive times and is still popular in society today. Discover the history of theater, its evolution through different cultures and movements, and those who have made a name for themselves through theater.

Elements of Drama: Characters, Plot, Setting & Symbolism

3. Elements of Drama: Characters, Plot, Setting & Symbolism

A Drama or a play, artistic writing expressed mainly through dialogue, is comprised of four elements: Character, Plot, Setting, and Symbolism. Explore the importance of each element, and the art behind dramatic form.

Tragedy in Drama: Classical to Modern

4. Tragedy in Drama: Classical to Modern

In drama, a tragedy is defined as a story in which the main character, often referred to as the 'tragic hero', experience hardships and suffers. This lesson will dive into the origins of tragedies in drama, the characteristics of such stories, and how tragedies have changed from their classical roots to modern times.

Dramatic Comedy: History and Types

5. Dramatic Comedy: History and Types

A dramatic comedy must contain a main character who, through change, brings about a happy ending. Explore the origin and definition of important terms, different types of comedy, and examples through history.

Dramatic Farce: History, Examples and Playwrights

6. Dramatic Farce: History, Examples and Playwrights

A dramatic farce is a plot or situation meant to entertain audiences by putting the characters in comical or outrageous situations. Learn more about the history of dramatic farce, what characteristics define the genre, and famous examples like 'The Importance of Being Earnest'.

Elements of Melodrama: From Early Theater to the Modern Soap Opera

7. Elements of Melodrama: From Early Theater to the Modern Soap Opera

A melodrama is a story or plot that focuses on the struggle of good versus evil, and eventually leads to the hero defeating the villain. Discover the beginnings of melodramas, what characteristics define the genre, and how this storyline is used in modern media, such as soap operas.

Futurism, Dada, Surrealism & Expressionism

8. Futurism, Dada, Surrealism & Expressionism

Futurism, Dada, Surrealism, and Expressionism were different theater movements that coexisted between 1900 and 1960. Explore comparisons and contrasts between these dramatic movements of the early 1900s.

Epic Theatre: Brecht

9. Epic Theatre: Brecht

Epic theatre was developed by Bertolt Brecht to promote change upon the audience's reflection of the instructional presentation using reason, instead of emotion. Explore the characteristics of Brecht's epic theatre through famous examples.

Theatre of Cruelty: Artaud

10. Theatre of Cruelty: Artaud

Antonin Artaud's Theater of Cruelty attempted to help audiences overcome their fears by asking them to face graphic portrayals of violence. Learn about the theater's historical context of surrealism, explore an overview of the Theater of Cruelty's characteristics, and then read examples of the plays performed there.

Theatre of the Absurd

11. Theatre of the Absurd

Existentialism is the concept that free will and personal choice help individuals find their purpose in life. Learn about the elements and historical context of the Theatre of the Absurd and how Samuel Beckett's 1949 play, 'Waiting for Godot', is considered a foundational example of this genre.

Analyzing Dramatic Works: Theme, Character Development & Staging

12. Analyzing Dramatic Works: Theme, Character Development & Staging

Dramatic works generally refer to plays, choreography, screenplays, and other art that is intended to be performed. Learn about dramatic works, and explore the elements of analysis for dramatic works, including themes, character development, staging, type of play, plot, and stage directions. Understand how drama differs from prose, and recognize that a theatrical piece can be analyzed as literary art.

Characters in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

13. Characters in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

In this lesson, we'll take a look at the humorous play 'The Importance of Being Earnest' by Oscar Wilde and get to know the main characters. Through a twist of events, the real 'Ernest' appears at the end of the play, and the character of Jack Worthing learns how important it is to be honest and sincere.

The Crucible by Arthur Miller: Characters, Themes & Analysis

14. The Crucible by Arthur Miller: Characters, Themes & Analysis

The Crucible, written by Arthur Miller in 1953, is a famous American play that details an imagined series of events from the Salem witch trials. Discover more about The Crucible, its characters, its themes, and a brief summary of the play.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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More Exams
There are even more practice exams available in 9th Grade Dramatic Literature: Homework Help.

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