Ch 18: 9th Grade English: Argumentative Reading & Writing

About This Chapter

These lessons can help high school students gain a better understanding of argumentative reading and writing. Students can use these lessons if they're looking for supplemental materials for homework or need a solution for earning high school English credit.

9th Grade English: Argumentative Reading & Writing - Chapter Summary

As students improve their reading and writing skills, they will begin to realize that every piece of writing is created for a different purpose. In these lessons, students can review details about argumentative writing, including key characteristics of this type of writing and how to reproduce it. This chapter has been separated into several short lessons, and each lesson focuses on one key aspect of the topic. Not only do shorter, highly-focused lessons help students stay engaged, but they also make the chapter easier to navigate, allowing them to find the exact information they need to review. After completing these lessons, students should be prepared to:

  • Explain the difference between a topic and an argument
  • Point out steps for writing a great argument
  • Review techniques for structuring arguments and essays
  • Differentiate between the various parts of an argument
  • Establish methods for developing concluding statements
  • Evaluate the validity and effectiveness of arguments
  • Inspect writing for stereotypes, assumptions, and biases
  • Apply rhetorical devices and determine their effectiveness

8 Lessons in Chapter 18: 9th Grade English: Argumentative Reading & Writing
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Topic vs. Argument in a Reading Passage

1. Topic vs. Argument in a Reading Passage

Understanding the distinction between topic and argument is an important part of becoming a critical reader. Here's the difference, with examples. Also review how to identify the support for an argument in a passage.

How to Write a Great Argument

2. How to Write a Great Argument

Sometimes essays and other writings are intended to persuade our audience to favor an idea of some sort. Learn how to write a great argument using a 6-step process for creating a powerful essay that is on target, reasonable, well-written, and supported by reliable sources.

How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

3. How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

Some essays are used to argue a perspective and persuade an audience. Learn how to structure and organize an argument in an essay and recognize the components needed to create a strong argument.

Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

4. Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

An effective argument is meant to persuade others of the speakers claim. Discover more about the four parts of an argument--the claim, counterclaim, reason, and evidence--how each part functions and how they come together to build a strong argument.

Concluding Statements: Supporting Your Argument

5. Concluding Statements: Supporting Your Argument

Concluding statements are closing sentences that summarize the main points, findings, and arguments of an essay. Learn about persuasive essays, and understand how including conclusion and consequences support arguments in an essay.

How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

6. How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze an argument. We will pay close attention to the parts of an argument and the questions we must ask about each of those parts in order to determine the argument's effectiveness and validity.

Recognizing Biases, Assumptions & Stereotypes in Written Works

7. Recognizing Biases, Assumptions & Stereotypes in Written Works

In this lesson, we will define and learn how to recognize biases, assumptions and stereotypes in written works. We will also practice identifying these elements with a few writing samples.

Evaluating Rhetorical Devices in Writing

8. Evaluating Rhetorical Devices in Writing

In this lesson, we will study a variety of rhetorical devices that commonly appear in written texts. We will look at rhetoric on the level of sounds, words, sentences, and figures of speech.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 220 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support