Ch 3: 9th Grade English: Literary Terms & Devices

About This Chapter

With these lessons, students can learn the definitions and see examples of literary terms and devices. This chapter can help students who are trying to earn credits to graduate faster, and it can also help students who need to make up assignments.

9th Grade English: Literary Terms & Devices - Chapter Summary

As there are whole books dedicated to defining literary terms and devices, students may feel apprehensive about learning this information. Fortunately, this chapter provides a broad overview of the major literary terms and devices that high school students will encounter. Instead of trying to force students to get through a never-ending chapter of terms and concepts, the instructors split the chapter into manageable lessons. Each lesson tackles one or two concepts, allowing students to understand the information fully before moving on. Students can also use the lesson quizzes as a way to evaluate how much they have learned. By the end of this chapter, students should know how to do the following:

  • Describe literary devices and provide examples
  • Identify the difference between apostrophe and personification
  • Analyze the definition of allegory and its history
  • Check out the purpose of oxymoron in literature
  • Define a flashback and its function within storytelling
  • Examine the use of sarcasm in writing
  • Compare the different types of irony

7 Lessons in Chapter 3: 9th Grade English: Literary Terms & Devices
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Literary Devices: Definition & Examples

1. Literary Devices: Definition & Examples

This lesson studies some of the more common literary devices found in literature. Devices studied include allusion, diction, epigraph, euphemism, foreshadowing, imagery, metaphor/simile, personification, point-of-view and structure.

Personification and Apostrophe: Differences & Examples

2. Personification and Apostrophe: Differences & Examples

In this lesson, explore how writers use personification to give human characteristics to objects, ideas, and animals. Learn about apostrophe, or when characters speak to objects, ideas, and even imaginary people as if they were also characters.

Allegory in Literature: History, Definition & Examples

3. Allegory in Literature: History, Definition & Examples

Learn about allegories and how stories can be used to deliver messages, lessons or even commentaries on big concepts and institutions. Explore how allegories range from straightforward to heavily-veiled and subtle.

Oxymoron in Literature: Definition, Purpose & Examples

4. Oxymoron in Literature: Definition, Purpose & Examples

In this lesson, you'll review figurative language and its purpose in literature. Then, take a closer look at the term oxymoron and analyze some examples.

What is a Flashback in Literature? - Definition & Examples

5. What is a Flashback in Literature? - Definition & Examples

This lesson will assist you in identifying and understanding the components of flashbacks found in literature. See examples of flashbacks, and then test your understanding through a quiz.

Sarcasm in Literature: Example & Explanation

6. Sarcasm in Literature: Example & Explanation

In this lesson, we will define sarcasm. We will then look at sarcasm in literature, including why an author would use sarcasm, the history of it in literature, and then some of the examples in writings.

Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

7. Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

Discover, once and for all, what irony is and is not. Explore three types of irony: verbal, situational and dramatic, and learn about some famous and everyday examples.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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