Ch 9: Nonfiction Texts: Gettysburg Address & Washington's Farewell

About This Chapter

Students can go over these lessons to discover how to analyze nonfiction texts. Teachers may assign this chapter to students who are trying to earn extra credits or who need to make-up class assignments.

Nonfiction Text Analysis - Chapter Summary

Although high school students often analyze works of fiction, students may struggle with understanding nonfiction texts. This chapter offers an extensive overview concerning different techniques for approaching works of nonfiction.

All lesson materials can be accessed online via any Internet-ready device, making it easier for busy students to study from anywhere that offers Wi-Fi. The interactive features, including quizzes and video lessons, keep students focused and engaged as they go over this information. By examining each lesson in this chapter, students should be prepared to do the following:

  • Describe the implied main idea of a text
  • Identify supporting details that relate to the main point
  • Detail the sequence of events occurring within informational texts
  • Analyze the structure of a nonfiction text
  • Gather information from supplemental features used in nonfiction texts
  • Understand the use of persuasion, informed opinion, and fact in nonfiction
  • Examine the 'Gettysburg Address' and provide an analysis
  • Explain the main points of George Washington's 'Farewell Address'

8 Lessons in Chapter 9: Nonfiction Texts: Gettysburg Address & Washington's Farewell
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

1. Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

What's the point? If you're having trouble answering this question, you might need to learn more about implied main ideas. This lesson gives a definition and examples, along with explanations on how to identify them!

How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

2. How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the supporting details that explain the main idea being presented in a piece of literature. You will also learn different strategies that can be applied to future questions about the main idea.

Analyzing Sequence of Events in an Informational Text

3. Analyzing Sequence of Events in an Informational Text

In this lesson, you will learn how to identify the different types of sequencing of events from non-fiction, informational text. You will learn how to use context clues and make inferences about the ordering of events in a text.

Analyzing Structure in an Informational Text

4. Analyzing Structure in an Informational Text

In this lesson, we examine several of the most common structures that an informational text might use and the different ways each structure helps an author create an argument or deliver their message.

How Supplemental Features Add to an Informational Text

5. How Supplemental Features Add to an Informational Text

Informational texts are nonfiction writings that inform the audience about a topic. To help organize these texts, supplemental features are used. These include print features, organizational aids, and visuals.

Fact vs. Persuasion vs. Informed Opinion in Nonfiction

6. Fact vs. Persuasion vs. Informed Opinion in Nonfiction

How do you know what to believe and what to doubt? Watch this video lesson to learn how to differentiate between facts, persuasion, and informed opinions.

Gettysburg Address: Summary & Analysis

7. Gettysburg Address: Summary & Analysis

This lesson discusses the Gettysburg Address, one of the most famous speeches in American history. Learn more about what Abraham Lincoln's speech means and test your knowledge with a quiz.

George Washington's Farewell Address

8. George Washington's Farewell Address

This lesson describes George Washington's farewell address, in which he gives thought-provoking and practical advice for preserving the union of a young United States of America.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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