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Ch 24: Abnormal Psychology Basics: Homeschool Curriculum

About This Chapter

The Abnormal Psychology Basics unit of this Homeschool course is designed to help homeschooled students learn about common psychological disorders. Parents can use the short videos to introduce topics, break up lessons and keep students engaged.

Who's it for?

This unit of our High School Psychology Homeschool course will benefit any student who is trying to learn about common psychological disorders. There is no faster or easier way to learn about abnormal psychology basics. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who require an efficient, self-paced course of study to learn about the causes of abnormal behavior or abnormal human development.
  • Homeschool parents looking to spend less time preparing lessons and more time teaching.
  • Homeschool parents who need a psychology curriculum that appeals to multiple learning types (visual or auditory).
  • Gifted students and students with learning differences.

How it works:

  • Students watch a short, fun video lesson that covers a specific unit topic.
  • Students and parents can refer to the video transcripts to reinforce learning.
  • Short quizzes and the Abnormal Psychology Basics unit exam confirm understanding or identify any topics that require review.

Abnormal Psychology Basics Unit Objectives:

  • Learn to define mental health.
  • Explore the dimensions of psychopathology.
  • Explore the history of abnormality in psychology.
  • Study biological and medical abnormalities.

19 Lessons in Chapter 24: Abnormal Psychology Basics: Homeschool Curriculum
What is Abnormal Psychology? - Definition and Common Disorders Studied

1. What is Abnormal Psychology? - Definition and Common Disorders Studied

What is abnormality? How do psychologists study abnormality? In this lesson, we will define abnormal psychology, look at two theories to explain what causes abnormality and examine three examples of disorders studied in abnormal psychology.

The Psychology of Abnormal Behavior: Understanding the Criteria & Causes of Abnormal Behavior

2. The Psychology of Abnormal Behavior: Understanding the Criteria & Causes of Abnormal Behavior

What is abnormal behavior? In this lesson, we will look at how psychologists define abnormality, the criteria they use to identify it, and some common causes of abnormal behavior.

Abnormal Human Development: Definition & Examples

3. Abnormal Human Development: Definition & Examples

Abnormal development occurs when a person develops an unusual pattern of behavior, emotion or thought. In this lesson, you will learn what abnormal development is, how it is determined and examine different examples.

Biological and Medical History of Abnormality in Psychology

4. Biological and Medical History of Abnormality in Psychology

Somatogenic theory views mental illness as a medical condition and dates back to ancient Greece. In this lesson, we will look at the history of somatogenic theory, including key historical figures like Hippocrates, Franz Anton Mesmer, Benjamin Rush, and Emil Kraepelin.

Mental Health & Psychopathology: Definition & Dimensions

5. Mental Health & Psychopathology: Definition & Dimensions

In this lesson, we will explore some of the basic ways that we differentiate between mental health and psychopathology. Included in this is looking at social, behavioral, thought, and emotional processes.

Psychoanalytic Schools Approach to Psychopathology Theory

6. Psychoanalytic Schools Approach to Psychopathology Theory

Here, we will explore the basic tenants of psychoanalysis and psychodynamic theories as they relate to psychopathology. Two techniques for treatment are also explored briefly.

The Psychodynamic Model and Abnormal Functioning

7. The Psychodynamic Model and Abnormal Functioning

There are many ways to view the causes and treatments of psychological disorders. In this lesson, we'll look closer at the psychodynamic model of psychology and its benefits and drawbacks.

Assessing the Psychodynamic Model: Strengths and Weaknesses

8. Assessing the Psychodynamic Model: Strengths and Weaknesses

When people think about psychology, many immediately think of Sigmund Freud. But, how good were his ideas? In this lesson, we'll look at the psychodynamic model of psychology and its strengths and weaknesses.

Humanistic Approach to Psychopathology Theory

9. Humanistic Approach to Psychopathology Theory

Here, we look at what gave rise to humanism and some of the field's basic ideas. We will also look into how humanism views psychopathology, as well as how it treats it.

Assessing the Humanistic-Existential Model: Strengths and Limitations

10. Assessing the Humanistic-Existential Model: Strengths and Limitations

Much of psychology focuses on the negative parts of human experience, but the humanistic-existential model of psychology looks at the positive potential of humans. In this lesson, we'll look at the strengths and weaknesses of the model.

The Behavioral Model and Abnormal Functioning

11. The Behavioral Model and Abnormal Functioning

What causes mental illness? Why do some people have psychological problems, while others don't? In this lesson, we'll look at one theory of abnormal psychology, the behavioral model.

Assessing the Behavioral/Learning Model in Psychotherapy

12. Assessing the Behavioral/Learning Model in Psychotherapy

Behavioral therapy is a popular way to treat certain psychological disorders. But how well does it work? And is it the best choice? In this lesson, we'll explore the strengths and weaknesses of the behavioral model of abnormality.

Sources of Biological Abnormalities: Genetics & Evolution

13. Sources of Biological Abnormalities: Genetics & Evolution

There are many factors that can affect a person's mental health. How do elements like genetics and evolution play a role in psychology? In this lesson, we'll look closer at how genetics and evolution can affect mental illness.

Assessing the Biological Model: Strengths and Weaknesses

14. Assessing the Biological Model: Strengths and Weaknesses

What causes mental illness? Some psychologists believe that psychological disorders are caused by physical problems. In this lesson, we'll assess the strengths and limitations of the biological model of abnormality.

The Sociocultural Model and Abnormal Functioning

15. The Sociocultural Model and Abnormal Functioning

There are many theories on what causes psychological issues. In this lesson, we'll explore the sociocultural model of abnormality, including what it is, what some key components of the theory are, and how sociocultural theorists treat abnormality.

Strengths and Weaknesses of the Sociocultural Model

16. Strengths and Weaknesses of the Sociocultural Model

How much of an impact do society and culture have on mental illness? Proponents of the sociocultural model believe that they play a major part. But there are both strengths and weaknesses of this model, which we'll examine in this lesson.

Physiological Causes & Explanations for Mental Illness

17. Physiological Causes & Explanations for Mental Illness

There are many factors that can affect a person's mental health, including physiological issues. In this lesson, we'll look at three major physical causes of psychological problems: infection, malnutrition, and metal poisoning.

The Cognitive Model in Psychology and Abnormal Functioning

18. The Cognitive Model in Psychology and Abnormal Functioning

Everyone has thoughts and beliefs. But how do those thoughts affect your mental health? In this lesson, we'll seek an answer to that question in the cognitive model of abnormal psychology and look closer at the A-B-C theory of processing.

Assessing the Cognitive Model in Psychology: Strengths and Weaknesses

19. Assessing the Cognitive Model in Psychology: Strengths and Weaknesses

The cognitive model of abnormality blames a person's thoughts for their psychological problems. But what makes it better than other psychological models? In this lesson, we'll look at the strengths and limitations of the cognitive model.

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