Ch 5: AEPA Reading K-8: Theoretical Models of Reading

About This Chapter

Review theoretical reading models for the Arizona Educator Proficiency Assessments (AEPA) Reading Endorsement K-8 exam. You'll work through lessons and practice quizzes to cover all the essential information you'll need to know for these types of exam questions.

AEPA Reading K-8: Theoretical Models of Reading - Chapter Summary

These chapter resources are designed to get you up to speed on theoretical models of reading for the AEPA Reading Endorsement K-8 exam. You'll find lessons on the following topics:

  • Overview of reading models
  • Top-down approaches to reading
  • Phonics-based reading instruction
  • Interactive reading models
  • The schema-theoretic approach
  • Scripts and schemata for knowledge organization

Our instructors have compiled a series of short lessons that will quickly get you up to speed on theoretical models for reading instruction. Track your progress through the chapter with the personal dashboard feature, and use the self-assessment quizzes and chapter exam to determine your readiness for the AEPA Reading exam.

AEPA Reading K-8: Theoretical Models of Reading Objectives

The AEPA Reading K-8 exam is part of the licensure process for elementary and middle school reading teachers in the state of Arizona. You'll need to answer 100 selected-answer questions and complete one written response. The exam lasts three and a half hours and is delivered electronically.

This chapter will prepare you for questions in the Theoretical and Research Foundations subarea of the exam, which makes up about 13% of the total test. Among other topics, you will be asked to recognize theoretical models of reading.

6 Lessons in Chapter 5: AEPA Reading K-8: Theoretical Models of Reading
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is a Reading Model? - Definition & Overview

1. What is a Reading Model? - Definition & Overview

What are reading models and how do they fit into classroom instruction? This lesson outlines the three major types of reading models and shows how each work.

Using the Top-Down or Whole Language Approach to Reading Instruction

2. Using the Top-Down or Whole Language Approach to Reading Instruction

When it comes to reading instruction, there is no one-size-fits-all approach. This lesson will familiarize you with the top-down or whole language approach to reading instruction.

Using the Phonics Approach to Reading Instruction

3. Using the Phonics Approach to Reading Instruction

The phonics approach to reading focuses on the individual sounds made by letters. This lesson will explore the phonics approach to reading instruction and will end with a brief quiz to test what you have learned.

Using an Interactive Reading Model for Instruction

4. Using an Interactive Reading Model for Instruction

In this lesson, you'll learn about bottom-up and top-down approaches to reading and their shortcomings. Then, you'll discover how an interactive reading model aims for the best of both worlds.

Using the Schema-Theoretic Approach to Reading Instruction

5. Using the Schema-Theoretic Approach to Reading Instruction

As a reader, are you just absorbing what a text says? In this lesson, we'll discuss the role of schemas in the reading process and how we interpret more than just words on a page.

Knowledge Organization: Schemata and Scripts

6. Knowledge Organization: Schemata and Scripts

How does your mind organize the world? When you see a new animal, can you easily tell if it's a bird, mammal or fish? Categories and mental structures, such as types of animals, are called schemata. This lesson discusses different types of schemata and why they are important.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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