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Ch 3: After the American Revolution: Homework Help Resource

About This Chapter

The After the American Revolution chapter of this Middle School US History Homework Help course helps students complete their post-American Revolution homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your post-American Revolution homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample questions and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your post-American Revolution homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Creation of state constitutions
  • Articles of Confederation
  • Northwest Ordinance
  • The Constitutional Convention
  • The US Constitution and the Bill of Rights
  • George Washington's new US government
  • The French Revolution
  • Whiskey Rebellion
  • Alien and Sedition Acts
  • President Adams and the XYZ Affair

16 Lessons in Chapter 3: After the American Revolution: Homework Help Resource
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The American Enlightenment: Intellectual and Social Revolution

1. The American Enlightenment: Intellectual and Social Revolution

For a thousand years, Europe had been living in the Dark Ages until a series of philosophical, religious and scientific movements helped turn on the lights. The Enlightenment began in Europe, but quickly spread throughout America in the 1700s and helped set the stage for a revolution against British rule.

The First Great Awakening: Religious Revival and American Independence

2. The First Great Awakening: Religious Revival and American Independence

While the Enlightenment was shaping the minds of 18th-century colonists, another movement, the First Great Awakening, was shaping their hearts. With freedom of conscience at its core, the Awakening led Americans to break with religious traditions and seek out their own beliefs while sharing common values.

The French and Indian War: Causes, Effects & Summary

3. The French and Indian War: Causes, Effects & Summary

In the mid-1700s, the Seven Years' War involved all of the world's major colonial powers on five continents. The biggest fight was between France and Great Britain, and the victor would come away with control of North America.

Sons of Liberty: Resistance to the Stamp Act and British Rule

4. Sons of Liberty: Resistance to the Stamp Act and British Rule

In 1763, British Prime Minister George Grenville passed new legislation aimed at solving some of the empire's problems stemming from the French and Indian War. The colonists cried, 'Taxation without representation is tyranny!' They organized boycotts, the Sons of Liberty and the Stamp Act Congress until some of the new taxes were lifted.

Boston Massacre: Colonists and the Declaratory and Townshend Acts

5. Boston Massacre: Colonists and the Declaratory and Townshend Acts

After overturning the hated Stamp Act, Parliament asserted its right to tax the colonists without representation by passing the Declaratory Act. When the Townshend Acts imposed import duties, the colonists went into action again. An escalating cycle of violence ended with the Boston Massacre, resulting in the cancellation of all duties except the one on tea.

The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

6. The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

Three years of calm followed the Boston Massacre and the repeal of most Townshend duties. But no sooner had Parliament passed a new tax on tea than the colonies were in an uproar again about taxation without representation. What followed were the Boston Tea Party and the fateful last steps leading to war.

Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

7. Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

Following the Boston Tea Party, Massachusetts was placed under the command of the British army. Rumors of a rebellion led to an attempted raid on the militia's arsenal. The events that followed at Lexington and Concord touched off the American Revolution.

The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

8. The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

1763 marked the beginning of the long road to revolution for the American colonies. By 1775, military actions had finally erupted. How were the colonists and their leaders going to respond?

The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

9. The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

After 12 years of tension and fighting, the colonists and their leaders were ready to declare themselves a new country, independent of Great Britain. This lesson examines the motives, the text, and the legacy of America's Declaration of Independence.

British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

10. British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

In this lesson, learn about the difficult decisions faced by individuals as the American Revolution erupted. Would you have been a Loyalist or a Patriot? Are you sure about that?

George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

11. George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

After a series of setbacks in 1776, George Washington's leadership of the Continental Army helped America turn the tide of the war in three pivotal locations, prompting France to recognize the United States as a nation and an ally.

John Paul Jones and the Naval Battles of the Revolutionary War

12. John Paul Jones and the Naval Battles of the Revolutionary War

Naval battles in the American Revolution are something of a lost chapter in history. Find out about the world's first military submarine, the privateers of the Continental Navy, and the helpful actions of three foreign allies at sea.

Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

13. Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

After surrendering their northern army in the American Revolution, British leaders looked to the Southern Strategy. General Charles Cornwallis hoped that loyalist forces would hold territory so he could sweep north and end the war in Virginia.

The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

14. The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

After the unsuccessful Southern Strategy, General Cornwallis pulled his army up to Yorktown, Virginia. A combined effort by the armies and navies of America and France resulted in British surrender and the 1783 Treaty of Paris that recognized the United States of America.

American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

15. American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

Learn about the impact of the Revolutionary War throughout the world, especially on various segments of American society. We'll look at political, social, and economic impacts.

The Second Great Awakening: Charles Finney and Religious Revival

16. The Second Great Awakening: Charles Finney and Religious Revival

The spirit of the Revolution led to changes in American churches in the post-war years. Beginning with a boom in evangelism and missionary work, the Second Great Awakening soon led to social reform, an intertwining of religious values with civic values, and a lasting emphasis on morality in daily life.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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